Episode 43 l 2019 Food Trends and Cookbooks
Episode 43 l 2019 Food Trends and Cookbooks

Welcome back to another episode of the Cookbook Love Podcast, today I am excited to talk to you about 2019 Food Trends and Cookbooks. I was recently involved in a research project to take a look at Health and Culinary Trends for a trends report. I have always enjoyed looking at food trends, and in particular how foods and trends in cooking or food make it into the mainstream. This happened with cilantro, from a relatively unknown and unused herb to an herb that millions of people now eat every day at Chipotle in their Lime Cilantro Rice. Food trends also make it into cookbooks more often than not, in particular, if the food trend is one that is embraced in kitchens and cooking. On this episode of the podcast, I select a few trends and take a look at cookbooks that reflect these trends as well as review the food trends below. 

2019 Health and Culinary Food Trends

  1. Wild weeds and green such as sorrel, dandelions, chickweed, mallow, amaranth as a replacement for kale.
  2. Citrus alternatives such as citron, kumquats, yuzu, shaddocks, and pomelos that provide sourness that’s popular as well as unique flavors.
  3. Seed butter to augment nut butter such as tahini, sunflower seed butter, roasted watermelon seed butter, pumpkin seed butter offering alternatives for allergies to tree nuts and peanuts.
  4. Ugly and misshapen food acceptance and use to reduce food with innovative ways to use all parts of food from nose to tail and stem to root.
  5. Digestive health and a newfound appreciation for the microbiome—trillions of bacteria and other microbes that live in our intestinal tract—more products (think fiber, prebiotics, and probiotics) are geared toward improving gut health
  6. Fermented drinks and food such as kefir, kimchi, kombucha, tempeh, miso.
  7. Adaptogens roots and herbs are a select group of herbs (and some mushrooms) that support the body’s natural ability to deal with stress. They are called adaptogens because of their unique ability to “adapt” their function according to the specific needs of the body. Examples include maca, ginseng, Rhodiola Rosea, reishi, ashwagandha holy basil, Schizandra.
  8. #veganuary and McVegan burgers tested at the Chicago McDonalds headquarters.
  9. Growth of the vegan, vegetarian, and eco-friendly movements, many are turning away from traditional protein sources like meat. Faux meats and plant-based meat options are available everywhere, from local co-ops to Target and Walmart.
  10. Meat-alternatives including plants, insects, lentils, soy, dairy-free protein alternatives going mainstream. Innovations highlighting nuts, extruded seeds, beans, water lentils and algae in snack bars, chips, meat-free burgers or sausages, and dairy-free yogurts and cheeses and cell-based meat and protein extracted from animals’ cells without killing the animal at all.
  11. Hemp hearts, seeds, and oils are in everything from waffle mix to dried pasta, and new interest in the potential benefits stemming from other parts of the hemp plant.
  12. Foods infused with CBD oil. CBD, also known as cannabidiol, has a multitude of uses including an ingredient in a variety of edibles defined as food or beverage products that