Episode 9| Interview with Lisa Goldstein of @cookinglikeImeanit
Episode 9| Interview with Lisa Goldstein of @cookinglikeImeanit

On this episode of the podcast, I interview Lisa Goldstein. Lisa is a home cook and cookbook collector from the San Francisco Area. Lisa’s love for cookbook started at an early age when she read cookbooks he mom had in the house. As Lisa grew up and learned about cooking her desire to try new things expanded  She started with buying cookbooks from James Mc Nair’s Pizza and Pie Cookbook. She then added general reference cookbooks, as well as books about food science that piqued her interest in why and how cooking works. As it stands now, Lisa’s interest in cookbooks has spanned from single-subject books to specialty cookbooks published by restaurants. In December 2017 Lisa decided to cook through a cookbook, so in the interview, we’ll talk more about her cookbook-cook- through and what she has learned from this experiment with cooking every recipe from one cookbook.

Listen to Episode 9 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

Here’s How To Subscribe

I’d love for you to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss any new episodes Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review for the podcast here. 

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?

Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks?

Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?

Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect outside of the Cookbook Love Podcast Facebook Group

Episode 8| Interview with Judy O’Dwyer, The Cookbook Club, The Villages, FL
Episode 8| Interview with Judy O’Dwyer, The Cookbook Club, The Villages, FL

Hi everybody and welcome back to another episode of the podcast. Today we have an interview with Founder and Coordinator of The Cookbook Club at the Villages, Florida, Judy ODwyer. Described as Florida’s friendliest hometown, The Villages is an over 55 retirement community. Judy started the Cookbook Club based on a model from a library in Ft. Wayne, Indiana as a way to get to know other residents of the Villages who shared her love for food, cooking, and cookbooks. In today’s interview, Judy describes the club including how they select topics, how she communicates with the members, as well as her tips for starting an in-person cookbook club.

Listen to Episode 8 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

Here’s How To Subscribe

I’d love for you to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss any new episodes Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review for the podcast here. 

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?

Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks?

Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?

Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect outside of the Cookbook Love Podcast Facebook Group

Episode 7| Interview with Eric Lee - Cookbook collector with over 2400 books
Episode 7| Interview with Eric Lee - Cookbook collector with over 2400 books

In this episode of the podcast, Maggie interviews Stay-At-Home-Dad and Cookbook Collector Eric Lee. Eric is SAHD from St Paul MN who started collecting cookbooks about 5 years ago out of a time in his family’s life when he needed to learn to cook for their evening meal. Eric’s first venture into cooking has a smoky ending when he prepared a meal with a  stovetop smoker and BBQ book but quickly grew into a passion for not only exploring cooking but collecting cookbooks as well. In today’s episode, Eric and I talk about his collection of over 2400 books, how he stores and organizes his collections, and his tips for where to begin if you’re new to cookbook collecting or cooking.

Listen to Episode 7 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

   

Here’s How To Subscribe

I’d love for you to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss any new episodes Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review for the podcast here. 

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?

Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks?

Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?

Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect outside of the Cookbook Love Podcast Facebook Group

Episode  6| Interview with Ally Billhorn of Sweet and Savory Eats
Episode 6| Interview with Ally Billhorn of Sweet and Savory Eats

In this episode of the podcast, Maggie interviews Ally Billhorn. Ally is a food blogger at Sweet and Savory Eats. Ally’s cookbook interaction has spanned the gamut. Her first experience with print recipes was when she was in college with Taste of Home Magazine and their companion cookbooks. Ally then subscribed to a cookbook-of-the-month club, and started receiving cookbooks as gifts. As a food blogger, now Ally receives from publishers who want her to review their cookbooks on her blog. Ally loves the stories that authors include in cookbooks for the connection to the author including why they make a recipe and who they serve it to. To her, this feels like a conversation with the author, which Ally loves and something that she tries to mimic on her food blog.

Listen to Episode 006 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

Here’s How To Subscribe

I’d love for you to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss any new episodes Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal.

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?
Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks?
Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?
Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect outside of the Cookbook Love Podcast Facebook Group.

 

 

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Episode 5| Interview with Gina Michak of From Gina’s Kitchen
Episode 5| Interview with Gina Michak of From Gina’s Kitchen

In this episode of the podcast, Maggie interviews cookbook collector Gina Michak. Gina describes herself as a Pittsburg gal living in Virginia and as a self-proclaimed Disney fanatic. Gina owns a business called From Gina’s Kitchen where she bakes specialty cakes, cupcakes, and cookies for her clients. Gina’s favorite features of a cookbook are the stories, entertainment ideas, and suggestions for wine pairings. In this interview, we talk about Gina’s Disney cookbook collection, her love of books about cocktails and bar drinks, as well as how she enjoys finding used and vintage cookbooks at her church parish’s festival.

Listen to Episode 005 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

Here’s How To Subscribe

I’d love for you to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss any new episodes Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal.

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?
Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks?
Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?
Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect outside of the Cookbook Love Podcast Facebook Group.

 

 

 …

Episode 4| Interview with Monique Llamas of Hardcover Cook
Episode 4| Interview with Monique Llamas of Hardcover Cook

In this episode of the podcast, Maggie interviews cookbook “obsessive” Monique Llamas. Monique participates in online cookbook clubs and loves new release cookbooks. For the past 11 years, Monique has kept a recipe journal to document her use of cookbooks. In our interview, we discuss her journal and how she uses it to inform what she cooks every day. Monique learned her love of cookbooks, and cooking, from her Mom and she bought her first Betty Crocker cookbook when she was in college. In the interview, we talk about Monique’s participation in website-, Facebook-, and social media-based cookbook clubs and the features of cookbook’s she loves.

Listen to Episode 004 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

Here’s How To Subscribe

I’d love for you to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss any new episodes.

How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal.

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?
Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks?
Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?
Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect outside of the Cookbook Love Podcast Facebook Group.

 

 

 …

Episode 3| Interview with cookbook reader and collector Kim Cowherd
Episode 3| Interview with cookbook reader and collector Kim Cowherd

In this episode of the podcast, Maggie interviews cookbook reader and collector Kim Cowherd. Kim is a fellow Kentuckian and retired horticulturist. She has a love of gardening and farmers’ markets due to her horticulture background. Kim has a fondness for stories found in cookbooks with a particular interest in church and community cookbooks.

Listen to Episode 003 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

Here’s How To Subscribe

I’d love for you to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss any new episodes

How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal.

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?
Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks?
Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?
Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect outside of the Cookbook Love Podcast Facebook Group.

 

 

 …

Episode 2| Interview with Jenny Hartin of Cookbook Junkies Facebook Group and Eat Your Books
Episode 2| Interview with Jenny Hartin of Cookbook Junkies Facebook Group and Eat Your Books

In this episode, Maggie interviews Jenny Hartin. Jenny is the owner and administrator of  Cookbook Junkies Facebook Group and cookbookjunkies.com as well as the Director of Publicity for Eat Your Books. Jenny shares her introduction into the cookbook space as a cook and cookbook collector, why she started Cookbook Junkies and her role as Director of Publicity for Eat Your Books.

Listen to Episode 002 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

Here’s How To Subscribe

I’d love for you to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss any new episodes. Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus, iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review right here.

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?
Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks?
Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?
Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect outside of the Cookbook Love Podcast Facebook Group.

 

 

 …

Episode 1| Interview with Kelsey Banfield of Little Snack Newsletter
Episode 1| Interview with Kelsey Banfield of Little Snack Newsletter

In this episode to the podcast, Maggie interview Kelsey Banfield of The Little Snack Newsletter. Kelsey shares about her love of organizing her cookbooks by color, what she learned from her mom about cookbooks, and more about her newsletter The Snack Cookbook Club.

Listen to Episode 001 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

Here’s How To Subscribe

I’d love for you to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss any new episodes. Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus, iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review right here.

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?
Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks?
Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?
Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect outside of the Cookbook Love Podcast Facebook Group.

 

 

 …

Episode 0 | Introduction and Welcome to Cookbook Love Podcast
Episode 0 | Introduction and Welcome to Cookbook Love Podcast

In this welcome and introductory episode to the podcast, host Maggie Green shares her vision, mission, and goals for the show. In addition learn how to connect with Maggie, with the larger Cookbook Love Podcast Community, and how to access show notes for each episode.

Listen to Episode 000 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

Here’s How To Subscribe & Leave A Review (pretty-please):

Want to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss a thing? Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review right here.

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept? Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks? Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show? Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect.

You can also join my free Facebook Group to connect with more cookbook readers, buyers, writers, collectors, and clubs.

 

 

 …

Celebrating 31 years
Celebrating 31 years

 

Today the Best Male Cook and I are celebrating our 31st wedding anniversary.

We were married on a hot September Labor Day weekend in Lexington, KY.

Warren is an incredible person and loving father. He owns an old New Braunfels grill of which he is a master (follow my Instagram stories @greenapron to see the holey-grill) and he brews “liquid bread” for all to enjoy.

The fact that we’re celebrating our anniversary doesn’t have a lot to do with cookbooks, specifically, but I do believe there are a few similarities between long-term, committed relationships, and writing and running a business. If you’ll humor me, I’ll expand a little bit.

When I married Warren I made a decision to be married and to stay married to him. I also made a pact with myself: to hold up my end of the bargain to take care of myself and provide for my own happiness. I’ve always known that Warren isn’t here to make me happy. That’s my job and completely within my power. His job is to be here for me to love. And he does that well as a steady, consistent presence in my life.

With my cookbooks, coaching clients, and business I decided to think the same way. I hold up my end of the bargain. In order to cook, be on my feet in a kitchen, write, and manage my business, I take care of myself physically and emotionally. I value health so that I can show up to cook, write, and coach every day. My books and my business aren’t here to make me happy. It’s my job to manage my thoughts and have fun all along the way so that ideas and inspiration and motivation flow and so that I have a happy life, and not wait for the perfect book, clients, or situation to make me happy. Then, the offshoot is that I can write and create and teach from that good-feeling place. In turn, my books help you and you, in turn, can share your value with the world you live in. That’s the awesome, rippling power of making clear decision to do something.

After I decided to be married, I committed to Warren and to the idea of being married. I’m not saying that it was always easy, but it’s certainly been possible. I looked to create the future I wanted. I found friends who are examples of committed relationships. We spent time with them and valued what they did to remain committed. This commitment shut the door on entertaining other options and wow, that freed up so much of my brain power to do other fun things.

In a similar fashion, with my cookbooks, coaching clients, and business, I am committed to them all as well. Once I sign a contract, I finish the book. When a client enrolls in coaching, I show up and stick with them as long as they are gaining benefit from the coaching relationship. I commit to …

Cookbook Author Interview Series: Lori Rice: Decide If You Want To Write A Book Or If You Are Married To An Idea
Cookbook Author Interview Series: Lori Rice: Decide If You Want To Write A Book Or If You Are Married To An Idea

When I introduce these interviews I  try to give readers a little insight into how I know the author I’m interviewing. Here’s the funny thing with Lori: I know her. We’ve met. I follow her on Instagram. We DM each other there, but I for the life of me couldn’t remember exactly who introduced us or how we met. I did recall a few details: we met in Lexington at the Incredible Food Show in the fall of 2011. I was promoting my first cookbook, and Lori lived in the Lexington-area at the time. Beyond that, the details escaped me. So I emailed Lori and told her that I couldn’t remember exactly who introduced us. Could she fill me in? 

Here was her reply: “I think we may have originally met online when the girl who wrote [insert name of a particular blog] (I can’t remember her name) approached me to review your cookbook. Then I think we met in person at the show. Although I can’t remember who introduced us. It might have been J. but I feel like there was someone else showing me around that show and I can’t peg who it was!”  This made me laugh out loud. Neither of us could remember who introduced us! Regardless, Lori is a breath of fresh air and I love her cookbook concept for her cookbooks. Lori now lives in California, is an accomplished photographer, cookbook author, mom to 2 pugs, and is a “liquid bread” expert. Here’s my interview with the lovely Lori Rice.

What is the name of your cookbook?

Food on Tap: Cooking with Craft Beer

What was the publication date?

October 10, 2017

Is this your first cookbook?

Technically, no. Strangely, this is always a tough question for me to answer. My book, The Everything Guide to Food Remedies, published in March 2011. It contains 150 recipes focused on fighting and controlling disease. (I’m a nutritional scientist by education.) Writing it felt a lot like writing my blog, though.

My goal with cookbook writing was to have a book with focused recipes and photography. As a result, I rarely even mention my first book. I didn’t feel like a cookbook author until Food on Tap was published. Plus, I’m also a food photographer. It makes up the largest majority of my work these days. I really wanted to photograph my own book. Once I did, I felt like a part of the industry somehow. Like it solidified things for me professionally.

What compelled you to want to write a cookbook?

I love print. I enjoy the web-based work I do for my food blog and for my clients, but I’ve always liked to hold something in my hands. I’m not sure how to explain it, but personally, it feels like a bigger accomplishment. I feel the same way when I write for magazines. Writing a cookbook seemed like a good fit for my goals.

Do you have a food blog? Was your blog a

5 Myths About Writing A Cookbook
5 Myths About Writing A Cookbook

Writing a cookbook should not be a mysterious process. Writing a cookbook is not a project available only to celebrities and TV stars. If you have a passion for baking, nutrition, special diets, or cooking, and you have an audience who needs something you know about, then you can write a cookbook.

Over the past 8 years, I have written four cookbooks and have coached, and interviewed, numerous published cookbook authors. I’d like to take the opportunity here to dispel a few myths about writing a cookbook that may encourage you to get started writing your own cookbook so that you can share your expertise and get your message out into the world! You can have an impact with a book of your own.

Myth #1
I need to have a successful food blog before I write a cookbook.

While a food blog might help with the promotion of a cookbook or it may provide the path for you to connect with an agent or your audience, you do not have to have a food blog before you write a cookbook. I have written four cookbooks. I don’t have a food blog. I dabbled with a food blog many years ago, but it didn’t take long before I realized I had no interest in food photography. Also, I am interested more in cooking, writing recipes for future projects, and building my coaching business than I am in taking the time to learn how to photograph food. There are other cookbook authors who also don’t have a food blog. What I will say, however, is that you need a platform, and a website where your audience can find you and where you can collect email addresses to connect with them. If you are a nutrition consultant, dietitian, cooking or baking teacher, food or nutrition writer, you have a connection with an audience even without a food blog. Agents and publishers like robust platforms, but this is not always specifically built through a food blog.

Myth #2
I cannot write a book because someone has already written about my topic or concept.

Let’s put this myth to rest. Take a trip to a local bookstore or the Food, Cooking, and Wine section on Amazon.com and look at how many Italian cookbooks or cookie books or Paleo diet books are published and in print. Even if your topic has been written about before, there is room for you and your unique spin on the subject. That is the difference between your book and everyone else’s book – YOU! -and your unique approach to the topic. Insert yourself in any topic you write about and provide for your audience what they want and need in a way only you can. No one has written that book before.

Myth #3
I have to follow the traditional path to publication.

There are several routes to the publication of a cookbook. Large, commercial publishers look for authors with extensive, robust platforms that can drive big sales. Think …

Believe First. Then See.
Believe First. Then See.

Almost every morning during the warm weather months, and after my coffee and quiet time, I take a walk around my neighborhood. As I head out my back door, around to the front of the house, and down the steps to the sidewalk, I look around in our landscaping beds for weeds. When I see weeds, I pull them up and drop them on the sidewalk. Then, on my way back inside the house after my walk, I pick up the weeds and throw them away.

One morning, a few weeks ago, I found a bunch of clover growing behind a holly bush alongside the front my our house. I don’t know why I thought this, but I said to myself, “I’m going to find a four-leaf clover.” When I reached down to yank the clover roots out of the ground, no joke, there is was – a four-leaf clover.

*********************

I tell you this story because it made me realize something in a very simple way – whatever we believe or think we will find.

This is true in all parts of my life. Look for the good that your son does, the hard work of a client, or the kindness of your editor, and guess what  – it’s there. Look for the bad in the way your husband loads the dishwasher or the sulky in your teenager, and low and behold, that’s there too.

Before I became a dietitian, wife, personal chef, entrepreneur, mom, or writing coach, and before I wrote my first cookbook, edited the Joy of Cooking, or owned a home, I had to believe that I could do it. I didn’t have proof from past experience that I could do it and I couldn’t wait for the book or the business to appear before I believed – I had to believe first.

Every day I still practice believing without concrete proof or evidence. I ask myself what I need to believe to reach my goals. What does someone who has a podcast with a full-coaching schedule and book deals and mastermind groups who has time for exercise, healthy cooking, and eating, and her family, friends, and community thinks and believes? I write these beliefs down. I read them and practice believing them. I feel inspired and motivated. From this place, I then take action and get busy recording podcast episodes, coaching clients, facilitating mastermind, generating ideas, writing the words, buying the ingredients, cooking the meals, and showing up in my life, all driven by the thoughts and beliefs I practice and think.

Here’s the good news: this believing stuff isn’t just reserved just for me. It’s available to you as well. You too can have anything you want in your life as long as you practice believing. In fact, the results we all have in our lives right now are a reflection of past thoughts and beliefs. If we like the results we have, I suspect those results are driven by actions that stem from …

July Roundup
July Roundup

I am writing this from an Orlando hotel room. My youngest son and I traveled to Orlando for a basketball tournament at Disney’s ESPN Wide World of Sports. His team, the Kentucky Defenders, finished the tournament on Sunday and placed 3rd out of 52 teams. We’ve had an enjoyable time and even soaked in some of the Disney magic while we were here.

What is my favorite Quote for the Day?
First, think. Second, dream. Third, believe. And finally, dare. ~Walt Disney

What am I celebrating?
I celebrated a birthday in July. We had our children and their friends at our home for dinner. We grilled lamb burgers, and instead of birthday cake enjoyed a key lime pie from a local bakery. I feel good about being 54 and look forward to all the good things this year will bring.

What am I reading?
A Spoon of Blue Thread  by Anne Tyler. Literary Fiction. If you love character development and stories that display family life and relationships with families, Anne Tyler never disappoints. She’s from Baltimore and all her books are set in Baltimore. This book takes many twists and turns, keeping me interested as I read. This was a book I picked up last summer at a “take a book, share a book” shelf at a small hotel in Saugatuck, MI.

What am I learning? 
I do love Instagram. I am learning how to use Instagram more effectively to engage and connect with others rather than using Instagram to get inspired through pretty photos. I’m committing to more IG stories and DMs to connect with real people! Head on over to Instagram to join the fun @greenapron. And, DM me. I’ll DM back. That’s a real connection that we can’t get from just looking at the pretty photos.

What am I letting go of?
Expecting others to behave a certain way before I feel good and have fun. Guess what? People are going to say or do whatever they want to say or do. The good news is, it doesn’t have to affect me or my experience of the world. That’s my job to think thoughts that drive my experience of the world, and not relying on the actions of others to drive my experience. It all begins with how I think about things.

What can I share that you may find helpful?
Think of your best friend. Imagine your best friend sets a new, big goal. You’re so excited for them and cheer them on. Would we ever interfere with their goal or not cheer them on? They’re our friend!

Now, imagine that that best friend is you and that you’ve set a big goal. Here’s the good news: You deserve to treat yourself with the same respect you treat your best friend. You deserve to not let yourself interfere with your big goal.

When we interfere with our own goals it’s called self-sabotage. We self-sabotage our own work toward our goals in one of four ways: …

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 16
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 16

It’s time for my monthly Cookbook and Food Writing Links issue. But first, a message about the app I use to save links to articles I want to share in this newsletter.

How do I keep track of the articles? I use Pocket app, or the Chrome extension also called Pocket. Previously known as Read It Later, Pocket manages my reading list of articles. When I want to save a link, I share to Pocket from my iPhone and/or desktop Chrome extension. I can even tag the article. The article link is synced across all devices for reading anywhere. Ads and other screen clutter are removed from the article. The tagging assists with future sort and search. I highly recommend it.

COOKBOOKS
Cooking and Sci-Fi Are the Hot Print Segments This Year So Far

GOOGLE DOODLE
Back in March, I must have missed this Google doodle where for the first time, a cookbook writer was featured in the daily doodle to celebrate her 310th birthday. Hannah Glasse, born in 1708 and an English cookbook writer wrote The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy in 1747. Her popular book hailed 972 recipes and was written in simple and conversational English.

BUSINESS ADVICE
Kathleen Tale, the owner of Tate’s Bake Shop, offers advice for small business owners, that she learned through the opening and eventually loss of her first venture, Kathleen’s Bake Shop. When it comes to starting a small business, she says, count on it being four times harder than you dreamed — perseverance is key, and so is getting up, moving forward, and not staying attached to mistakes and failures. She said she learned the hard way that you can care, but getting too emotional will crush you.”

KITCHEN ARTS AND LETTERS
Food & Drink Bookseller, Kitchen Arts & Letters in NYC writes a nice newsletter and blog. They recently featured their Fall 2018 Notable Cookbooks article as well as a post on Classic Cookbooks People Won’t Even Look At (because of no photos). KAL also notes that in their observation there is a lack of professional pastry books written by women. Home baking, by the way, is ripe with female authors and professional female chefs who write about both savory topics, and home baking, but not professional baking. An opportunity here maybe?

MOST POPULAR BLOG POSTS ON GREENAPRON.COM
(wait for it)
Steps to Write A Cookbook: Write A Cookbook Proposal
4 Ways to Find a Traditional Cookbook Publisher
5 Tools and Software for Writing a Family or Fundraiser Cookbook 
Oven-Baked Chex Mix (I’m not even kidding! So popular)


Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

I’ve been

8 Tips from Q2
8 Tips from Q2

It’s the end of the 2nd quarter of the year, and I’m excited about my second 12 weeks of 2018. In early April, I set intentions about how I wanted Q2 to unfold. Here’s what has happened with some advice and tips for you and your business:

1. EVALUATE SOURCES OF FREE TRAFFIC
Look at how your potential customers are driven to your website. Where are they coming from? A lot of my traffic comes from Google searches, but in Q2 I worked to look at other ways to create free traffic such as being a guest on podcasts. Podcast content is evergreen. When you’re a guest, the episode is listened to over and over. I did see results from this with referrals of new clients from the podcasts where I was a guest.

2. START YOUR OWN PODCAST
This is a big one, and something you may want to consider, but, what about starting your own podcast? As of this blog post, I have purchased equipment, received training, hired a producer, scheduled interviews, created artwork, and named my podcast. I plan to record several episodes before the launch. And, if all goes well, I plan to launch in the 3rd quarter. I feel sort of scared about this – adding a piece of marketing that requires constant care and attention and updating, but I figure if I can write books, create recipe content, keep up with a weekly blog, etc., then I can add a podcast to the mix. I also at the same time feel excited to connect with the people who I will interview. I’m doing a podcast that I’d love to listen to, so for now, we’ll leave it at that, and hope that during our Q3 update, I have more specific news to share about how it’s going.

3. CREATE A HIGH-END OFFER
In March I created a high-end offer as a cookbook manuscript manager. The offer worked and I made sales around this offer. The service isn’t for everyone, but, it resonated with a few people on my list. That’s the spirit of a high-end offer. It needed to be of value, solve a problem, and help my customers get closer to their goal of writing a cookbook.

4. AUTOMATION AND ONBOARDING
I worked with my VA to create a streamlined and smooth system for onboarding private coaching clients. This makes the delivery of material for the coaching program easier and allows for very quick delivery of the materials once someone signs a coaching contract. Contracts are sent electronically for signature as well, which streamlines the process.

5. FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE
This quarter, with a focus on customer service, I decided to add my VA to the customer-service-side of email delivery and answering. I sell digital products, so having my VA monitor the customer service email box, responses are timely and prompt. This feels good and I like knowing that our customers are answered promptly and get their needs met and questions answered.…

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 15
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 15

Today it’s time for my monthly roundup of links for cookbooks, writing, and productivity.

TRAVEL AND COOKBOOKS
Research about cookbooks and the stores that sell them has been on my mind lately. If you’re traveling this summer, you may enjoy this list of cookbook shops around the world.

BEST COOKBOOKS
Here’s a list of the best baking cookbooks according to pastry chefs and professional bakers.

And a list of the 25 Best-Selling Cookbooks of All Time.

SELF PUBLISHING
Check out Ingram Spark if you want to self-publish a hard-cover, full-color photography cookbook. With the Ingram distribution behind them, your cookbook can be easily be ordered by bookstores for signing and author events. They also have a podcast called Go Publish Yourself, offer a Pocket Guide to Publishing, and courses on the Ingram Spark Academy.

RESTAURANT TRENDS
Exploring the effect of social media on restaurants and hospitality, and the difference between “casual” restaurants, restaurants change and adapt to movements in technology and the needs of their customers.

PRODUCTIVITY
I’ve always loved mornings. And it seems that Mel Robbins does too. Read Mel Robbins’ approach to working on her goals, first thing in the morning.

WRITING
Here’s an interesting blog post on The Write Life featuring 20 Inspiring Pinterest Boards for Writers.


Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

Checklist
An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

Cookbook Writing Workbook

What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

6 Tips for Well-Being
6 Tips for Well-Being

Being a mom can sometimes feel lonely. How can that be when surrounded by hustle, bustle, kids, and activity.

I venture to guess that in the absence of other mental illnesses, what we are lonely for is a connection with ourselves. When we’re raising children, we often lose touch with the best version of who we really are.

I’m here to say it’s not selfish to connect with you. Here’s my recipe for well-being that I try my best to practice.

1. Rest and sleep. There’s no heroism in sleep-deprivation. I literally used to love nap time when my kids were really little because I could take a power nap too. That’s not as necessary now, because my nighttime sleep isn’t interrupted, but I can’t overestimate the power of rest and sleep for your self-care.

2. Eat well. Choose foods that fuel your mom-self and give you energy. For me this means I limit sugar, alcohol, and simple carbohydrates from chips, crackers, cakes, cookies, and ice cream. I drink a lot of fresh water, eat a lot of colorful vegetables, lean protein, and healthy fats. My energy levels are great and I feel good most of the time. I attribute that physical feeling of well-being to what I eat and to my sleep.

3. Choose thoughts that serve you. Your environment will prove true whatever you think, so deliberately focus on what you want to show up in your life. If you think you’re kids are cranky, or that you’re crazy busy guess what? Your kids act cranky and you feel crazy busy. (Below is my favorite YouTube video on this brainpower center called the Reticular Activating System.)

4. In quiet sit, every morning, for at least 10 to 15 minutes. No phone. No TV. Just you and quiet. Try to avoid the mental to-do list. Just sit and listen and be.

5. Play with people who are fun and have fun with your kids. They aren’t always going to want you around, so if you have a craving to play, now’s the time. Picnics, nature walks, banging on pots and pans. Embrace this chance to do what other adults don’t always take the time to do – play and have fun. I used to tell myself having kids felt was like I was on vacation. And we had a lot of fun for sure.

6. Enjoy inputs that uplift – music, books, TV, movies. Uplifting generates good thoughts which drive positive emotions and actions. This is why the Hallmark Channel is so popular.

When we show up for ourselves and be the best we can be, we’re easier to be around. We don’t mind solitude, and we don’t look for people and activities outside of us to make us feel better. And, if you do feel lonely, and if you feel darkness overcomes you more often than not, please reach out to someone. You’re not alone.


Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook

Anthony Bourdain
Anthony Bourdain

It comes as no surprise  – the death of Anthony Bourdain has touched so many. Bourdain’s post-chef career as a food writer, author, and travel show host was launched by his writing, Don’t Eat Before Reading This, published in The New Yorker in April 1999.

Shortly after this no-name chef told his story about what happens behind closed doors in restaurants, he was offered a contract for his first book Kitchen Confidential. The rest, as they say, was history.

What captivated me was his willingness to go where most wouldn’t dare. His honest, descriptive, and shocking appraisals of life in a restaurant kitchen weren’t liked by all, but, by and large, his I-don’t-give-a-flying-you-know-what attitude and the sheer act of being himself created fans who loved and admired him for writing like he talked and being who he was.

Bourdain, interviewed on the occasion of his 60th birthday for First We Feast quipped, “I joke about not giving a f*** being a very good business model for me,” he said, “but it’s true. The absolute certainty that nobody was going to buy or read or care about Kitchen Confidential was what allowed me to write it. I didn’t have to think about what people expected. I didn’t care. And as a result, I was able to write this book quickly and without tormenting myself. And that seemed to work out and I learned from that experience and I tried very hard. Whether I’m meeting with a group of television executives or telling a story, I don’t think about ‘the fans’; I don’t think about what audiences expect, and I’m not afraid of what will they think of me, or what if they don’t like it and I’m not on television anymore.” And then the kicker, the thing that got the audience pumping, “You know, I’ll go back to brunch….. I don’t care.”

Here’s what I think is the saddest part of the whole turn of events this past week with Bourdain, and even in the same light, Kate Spade.  His fan’s love and admiration for him, and his bad-boy ways, wasn’t enough to overcome the darkness and despair, and maintain the energy required to continue to live life as he knew it.  So, he made the decision to leave it all, including a sweet 11-year old daughter.

My hope and belief is that he is now at peace connected to Love in a way that none of us have ever experienced. I for one would love to know what he really thinks about this “place”. For if there’s one mortal person I know I could count on for the full report it’s Anthony Bourdain.


Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

Do you feel