Episode 0 | Introduction and Welcome to Cookbook Love Podcast
Episode 0 | Introduction and Welcome to Cookbook Love Podcast

In this welcome and introductory episode to the podcast, host Maggie Green shares her vision, mission, and goals for the show. In addition learn how to connect with Maggie, with the larger Cookbook Love Podcast Community, and how to access show notes for each episode.

Listen to Episode 000 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

Here’s How To Subscribe & Leave A Review (pretty-please):

Want to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss a thing? Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review right here.

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept? Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks? Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show? Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect.

You can also join my free Facebook Group to connect with more cookbook readers, buyers, writers, collectors, and clubs.

 

 

 …

Celebrating 31 years
Celebrating 31 years

 

Today the Best Male Cook and I are celebrating our 31st wedding anniversary.

We were married on a hot September Labor Day weekend in Lexington, KY.

Warren is an incredible person and loving father. He owns an old New Braunfels grill of which he is a master (follow my Instagram stories @greenapron to see the holey-grill) and he brews “liquid bread” for all to enjoy.

The fact that we’re celebrating our anniversary doesn’t have a lot to do with cookbooks, specifically, but I do believe there are a few similarities between long-term, committed relationships, and writing and running a business. If you’ll humor me, I’ll expand a little bit.

When I married Warren I made a decision to be married and to stay married to him. I also made a pact with myself: to hold up my end of the bargain to take care of myself and provide for my own happiness. I’ve always known that Warren isn’t here to make me happy. That’s my job and completely within my power. His job is to be here for me to love. And he does that well as a steady, consistent presence in my life.

With my cookbooks, coaching clients, and business I decided to think the same way. I hold up my end of the bargain. In order to cook, be on my feet in a kitchen, write, and manage my business, I take care of myself physically and emotionally. I value health so that I can show up to cook, write, and coach every day. My books and my business aren’t here to make me happy. It’s my job to manage my thoughts and have fun all along the way so that ideas and inspiration and motivation flow and so that I have a happy life, and not wait for the perfect book, clients, or situation to make me happy. Then, the offshoot is that I can write and create and teach from that good-feeling place. In turn, my books help you and you, in turn, can share your value with the world you live in. That’s the awesome, rippling power of making clear decision to do something.

After I decided to be married, I committed to Warren and to the idea of being married. I’m not saying that it was always easy, but it’s certainly been possible. I looked to create the future I wanted. I found friends who are examples of committed relationships. We spent time with them and valued what they did to remain committed. This commitment shut the door on entertaining other options and wow, that freed up so much of my brain power to do other fun things.

In a similar fashion, with my cookbooks, coaching clients, and business, I am committed to them all as well. Once I sign a contract, I finish the book. When a client enrolls in coaching, I show up and stick with them as long as they are gaining benefit from the coaching relationship. I commit to …

Cookbook Author Interview Series: Lori Rice: Decide If You Want To Write A Book Or If You Are Married To An Idea
Cookbook Author Interview Series: Lori Rice: Decide If You Want To Write A Book Or If You Are Married To An Idea

When I introduce these interviews I  try to give readers a little insight into how I know the author I’m interviewing. Here’s the funny thing with Lori: I know her. We’ve met. I follow her on Instagram. We DM each other there, but I for the life of me couldn’t remember exactly who introduced us or how we met. I did recall a few details: we met in Lexington at the Incredible Food Show in the fall of 2011. I was promoting my first cookbook, and Lori lived in the Lexington-area at the time. Beyond that, the details escaped me. So I emailed Lori and told her that I couldn’t remember exactly who introduced us. Could she fill me in? 

Here was her reply: “I think we may have originally met online when the girl who wrote [insert name of a particular blog] (I can’t remember her name) approached me to review your cookbook. Then I think we met in person at the show. Although I can’t remember who introduced us. It might have been J. but I feel like there was someone else showing me around that show and I can’t peg who it was!”  This made me laugh out loud. Neither of us could remember who introduced us! Regardless, Lori is a breath of fresh air and I love her cookbook concept for her cookbooks. Lori now lives in California, is an accomplished photographer, cookbook author, mom to 2 pugs, and is a “liquid bread” expert. Here’s my interview with the lovely Lori Rice.

What is the name of your cookbook?

Food on Tap: Cooking with Craft Beer

What was the publication date?

October 10, 2017

Is this your first cookbook?

Technically, no. Strangely, this is always a tough question for me to answer. My book, The Everything Guide to Food Remedies, published in March 2011. It contains 150 recipes focused on fighting and controlling disease. (I’m a nutritional scientist by education.) Writing it felt a lot like writing my blog, though.

My goal with cookbook writing was to have a book with focused recipes and photography. As a result, I rarely even mention my first book. I didn’t feel like a cookbook author until Food on Tap was published. Plus, I’m also a food photographer. It makes up the largest majority of my work these days. I really wanted to photograph my own book. Once I did, I felt like a part of the industry somehow. Like it solidified things for me professionally.

What compelled you to want to write a cookbook?

I love print. I enjoy the web-based work I do for my food blog and for my clients, but I’ve always liked to hold something in my hands. I’m not sure how to explain it, but personally, it feels like a bigger accomplishment. I feel the same way when I write for magazines. Writing a cookbook seemed like a good fit for my goals.

Do you have a food blog? Was your blog a

5 Myths About Writing A Cookbook
5 Myths About Writing A Cookbook

Writing a cookbook should not be a mysterious process. Writing a cookbook is not a project available only to celebrities and TV stars. If you have a passion for baking, nutrition, special diets, or cooking, and you have an audience who needs something you know about, then you can write a cookbook.

Over the past 8 years, I have written four cookbooks and have coached, and interviewed, numerous published cookbook authors. I’d like to take the opportunity here to dispel a few myths about writing a cookbook that may encourage you to get started writing your own cookbook so that you can share your expertise and get your message out into the world! You can have an impact with a book of your own.

Myth #1
I need to have a successful food blog before I write a cookbook.

While a food blog might help with the promotion of a cookbook or it may provide the path for you to connect with an agent or your audience, you do not have to have a food blog before you write a cookbook. I have written four cookbooks. I don’t have a food blog. I dabbled with a food blog many years ago, but it didn’t take long before I realized I had no interest in food photography. Also, I am interested more in cooking, writing recipes for future projects, and building my coaching business than I am in taking the time to learn how to photograph food. There are other cookbook authors who also don’t have a food blog. What I will say, however, is that you need a platform, and a website where your audience can find you and where you can collect email addresses to connect with them. If you are a nutrition consultant, dietitian, cooking or baking teacher, food or nutrition writer, you have a connection with an audience even without a food blog. Agents and publishers like robust platforms, but this is not always specifically built through a food blog.

Myth #2
I cannot write a book because someone has already written about my topic or concept.

Let’s put this myth to rest. Take a trip to a local bookstore or the Food, Cooking, and Wine section on Amazon.com and look at how many Italian cookbooks or cookie books or Paleo diet books are published and in print. Even if your topic has been written about before, there is room for you and your unique spin on the subject. That is the difference between your book and everyone else’s book – YOU! -and your unique approach to the topic. Insert yourself in any topic you write about and provide for your audience what they want and need in a way only you can. No one has written that book before.

Myth #3
I have to follow the traditional path to publication.

There are several routes to the publication of a cookbook. Large, commercial publishers look for authors with extensive, robust platforms that can drive big sales. Think …

Believe First. Then See.
Believe First. Then See.

Almost every morning during the warm weather months, and after my coffee and quiet time, I take a walk around my neighborhood. As I head out my back door, around to the front of the house, and down the steps to the sidewalk, I look around in our landscaping beds for weeds. When I see weeds, I pull them up and drop them on the sidewalk. Then, on my way back inside the house after my walk, I pick up the weeds and throw them away.

One morning, a few weeks ago, I found a bunch of clover growing behind a holly bush alongside the front my our house. I don’t know why I thought this, but I said to myself, “I’m going to find a four-leaf clover.” When I reached down to yank the clover roots out of the ground, no joke, there is was – a four-leaf clover.

*********************

I tell you this story because it made me realize something in a very simple way – whatever we believe or think we will find.

This is true in all parts of my life. Look for the good that your son does, the hard work of a client, or the kindness of your editor, and guess what  – it’s there. Look for the bad in the way your husband loads the dishwasher or the sulky in your teenager, and low and behold, that’s there too.

Before I became a dietitian, wife, personal chef, entrepreneur, mom, or writing coach, and before I wrote my first cookbook, edited the Joy of Cooking, or owned a home, I had to believe that I could do it. I didn’t have proof from past experience that I could do it and I couldn’t wait for the book or the business to appear before I believed – I had to believe first.

Every day I still practice believing without concrete proof or evidence. I ask myself what I need to believe to reach my goals. What does someone who has a podcast with a full-coaching schedule and book deals and mastermind groups who has time for exercise, healthy cooking, and eating, and her family, friends, and community thinks and believes? I write these beliefs down. I read them and practice believing them. I feel inspired and motivated. From this place, I then take action and get busy recording podcast episodes, coaching clients, facilitating mastermind, generating ideas, writing the words, buying the ingredients, cooking the meals, and showing up in my life, all driven by the thoughts and beliefs I practice and think.

Here’s the good news: this believing stuff isn’t just reserved just for me. It’s available to you as well. You too can have anything you want in your life as long as you practice believing. In fact, the results we all have in our lives right now are a reflection of past thoughts and beliefs. If we like the results we have, I suspect those results are driven by actions that stem from …

July Roundup
July Roundup

I am writing this from an Orlando hotel room. My youngest son and I traveled to Orlando for a basketball tournament at Disney’s ESPN Wide World of Sports. His team, the Kentucky Defenders, finished the tournament on Sunday and placed 3rd out of 52 teams. We’ve had an enjoyable time and even soaked in some of the Disney magic while we were here.

What is my favorite Quote for the Day?
First, think. Second, dream. Third, believe. And finally, dare. ~Walt Disney

What am I celebrating?
I celebrated a birthday in July. We had our children and their friends at our home for dinner. We grilled lamb burgers, and instead of birthday cake enjoyed a key lime pie from a local bakery. I feel good about being 54 and look forward to all the good things this year will bring.

What am I reading?
A Spoon of Blue Thread  by Anne Tyler. Literary Fiction. If you love character development and stories that display family life and relationships with families, Anne Tyler never disappoints. She’s from Baltimore and all her books are set in Baltimore. This book takes many twists and turns, keeping me interested as I read. This was a book I picked up last summer at a “take a book, share a book” shelf at a small hotel in Saugatuck, MI.

What am I learning? 
I do love Instagram. I am learning how to use Instagram more effectively to engage and connect with others rather than using Instagram to get inspired through pretty photos. I’m committing to more IG stories and DMs to connect with real people! Head on over to Instagram to join the fun @greenapron. And, DM me. I’ll DM back. That’s a real connection that we can’t get from just looking at the pretty photos.

What am I letting go of?
Expecting others to behave a certain way before I feel good and have fun. Guess what? People are going to say or do whatever they want to say or do. The good news is, it doesn’t have to affect me or my experience of the world. That’s my job to think thoughts that drive my experience of the world, and not relying on the actions of others to drive my experience. It all begins with how I think about things.

What can I share that you may find helpful?
Think of your best friend. Imagine your best friend sets a new, big goal. You’re so excited for them and cheer them on. Would we ever interfere with their goal or not cheer them on? They’re our friend!

Now, imagine that that best friend is you and that you’ve set a big goal. Here’s the good news: You deserve to treat yourself with the same respect you treat your best friend. You deserve to not let yourself interfere with your big goal.

When we interfere with our own goals it’s called self-sabotage. We self-sabotage our own work toward our goals in one of four ways: …

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 16
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 16

It’s time for my monthly Cookbook and Food Writing Links issue. But first, a message about the app I use to save links to articles I want to share in this newsletter.

How do I keep track of the articles? I use Pocket app, or the Chrome extension also called Pocket. Previously known as Read It Later, Pocket manages my reading list of articles. When I want to save a link, I share to Pocket from my iPhone and/or desktop Chrome extension. I can even tag the article. The article link is synced across all devices for reading anywhere. Ads and other screen clutter are removed from the article. The tagging assists with future sort and search. I highly recommend it.

COOKBOOKS
Cooking and Sci-Fi Are the Hot Print Segments This Year So Far

GOOGLE DOODLE
Back in March, I must have missed this Google doodle where for the first time, a cookbook writer was featured in the daily doodle to celebrate her 310th birthday. Hannah Glasse, born in 1708 and an English cookbook writer wrote The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy in 1747. Her popular book hailed 972 recipes and was written in simple and conversational English.

BUSINESS ADVICE
Kathleen Tale, the owner of Tate’s Bake Shop, offers advice for small business owners, that she learned through the opening and eventually loss of her first venture, Kathleen’s Bake Shop. When it comes to starting a small business, she says, count on it being four times harder than you dreamed — perseverance is key, and so is getting up, moving forward, and not staying attached to mistakes and failures. She said she learned the hard way that you can care, but getting too emotional will crush you.”

KITCHEN ARTS AND LETTERS
Food & Drink Bookseller, Kitchen Arts & Letters in NYC writes a nice newsletter and blog. They recently featured their Fall 2018 Notable Cookbooks article as well as a post on Classic Cookbooks People Won’t Even Look At (because of no photos). KAL also notes that in their observation there is a lack of professional pastry books written by women. Home baking, by the way, is ripe with female authors and professional female chefs who write about both savory topics, and home baking, but not professional baking. An opportunity here maybe?

MOST POPULAR BLOG POSTS ON GREENAPRON.COM
(wait for it)
Steps to Write A Cookbook: Write A Cookbook Proposal
4 Ways to Find a Traditional Cookbook Publisher
5 Tools and Software for Writing a Family or Fundraiser Cookbook 
Oven-Baked Chex Mix (I’m not even kidding! So popular)


Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

I’ve been

8 Tips from Q2
8 Tips from Q2

It’s the end of the 2nd quarter of the year, and I’m excited about my second 12 weeks of 2018. In early April, I set intentions about how I wanted Q2 to unfold. Here’s what has happened with some advice and tips for you and your business:

1. EVALUATE SOURCES OF FREE TRAFFIC
Look at how your potential customers are driven to your website. Where are they coming from? A lot of my traffic comes from Google searches, but in Q2 I worked to look at other ways to create free traffic such as being a guest on podcasts. Podcast content is evergreen. When you’re a guest, the episode is listened to over and over. I did see results from this with referrals of new clients from the podcasts where I was a guest.

2. START YOUR OWN PODCAST
This is a big one, and something you may want to consider, but, what about starting your own podcast? As of this blog post, I have purchased equipment, received training, hired a producer, scheduled interviews, created artwork, and named my podcast. I plan to record several episodes before the launch. And, if all goes well, I plan to launch in the 3rd quarter. I feel sort of scared about this – adding a piece of marketing that requires constant care and attention and updating, but I figure if I can write books, create recipe content, keep up with a weekly blog, etc., then I can add a podcast to the mix. I also at the same time feel excited to connect with the people who I will interview. I’m doing a podcast that I’d love to listen to, so for now, we’ll leave it at that, and hope that during our Q3 update, I have more specific news to share about how it’s going.

3. CREATE A HIGH-END OFFER
In March I created a high-end offer as a cookbook manuscript manager. The offer worked and I made sales around this offer. The service isn’t for everyone, but, it resonated with a few people on my list. That’s the spirit of a high-end offer. It needed to be of value, solve a problem, and help my customers get closer to their goal of writing a cookbook.

4. AUTOMATION AND ONBOARDING
I worked with my VA to create a streamlined and smooth system for onboarding private coaching clients. This makes the delivery of material for the coaching program easier and allows for very quick delivery of the materials once someone signs a coaching contract. Contracts are sent electronically for signature as well, which streamlines the process.

5. FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE
This quarter, with a focus on customer service, I decided to add my VA to the customer-service-side of email delivery and answering. I sell digital products, so having my VA monitor the customer service email box, responses are timely and prompt. This feels good and I like knowing that our customers are answered promptly and get their needs met and questions answered.…

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 15
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 15

Today it’s time for my monthly roundup of links for cookbooks, writing, and productivity.

TRAVEL AND COOKBOOKS
Research about cookbooks and the stores that sell them has been on my mind lately. If you’re traveling this summer, you may enjoy this list of cookbook shops around the world.

BEST COOKBOOKS
Here’s a list of the best baking cookbooks according to pastry chefs and professional bakers.

And a list of the 25 Best-Selling Cookbooks of All Time.

SELF PUBLISHING
Check out Ingram Spark if you want to self-publish a hard-cover, full-color photography cookbook. With the Ingram distribution behind them, your cookbook can be easily be ordered by bookstores for signing and author events. They also have a podcast called Go Publish Yourself, offer a Pocket Guide to Publishing, and courses on the Ingram Spark Academy.

RESTAURANT TRENDS
Exploring the effect of social media on restaurants and hospitality, and the difference between “casual” restaurants, restaurants change and adapt to movements in technology and the needs of their customers.

PRODUCTIVITY
I’ve always loved mornings. And it seems that Mel Robbins does too. Read Mel Robbins’ approach to working on her goals, first thing in the morning.

WRITING
Here’s an interesting blog post on The Write Life featuring 20 Inspiring Pinterest Boards for Writers.


Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

Checklist
An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

Cookbook Writing Workbook

What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

6 Tips for Well-Being
6 Tips for Well-Being

Being a mom can sometimes feel lonely. How can that be when surrounded by hustle, bustle, kids, and activity.

I venture to guess that in the absence of other mental illnesses, what we are lonely for is a connection with ourselves. When we’re raising children, we often lose touch with the best version of who we really are.

I’m here to say it’s not selfish to connect with you. Here’s my recipe for well-being that I try my best to practice.

1. Rest and sleep. There’s no heroism in sleep-deprivation. I literally used to love nap time when my kids were really little because I could take a power nap too. That’s not as necessary now, because my nighttime sleep isn’t interrupted, but I can’t overestimate the power of rest and sleep for your self-care.

2. Eat well. Choose foods that fuel your mom-self and give you energy. For me this means I limit sugar, alcohol, and simple carbohydrates from chips, crackers, cakes, cookies, and ice cream. I drink a lot of fresh water, eat a lot of colorful vegetables, lean protein, and healthy fats. My energy levels are great and I feel good most of the time. I attribute that physical feeling of well-being to what I eat and to my sleep.

3. Choose thoughts that serve you. Your environment will prove true whatever you think, so deliberately focus on what you want to show up in your life. If you think you’re kids are cranky, or that you’re crazy busy guess what? Your kids act cranky and you feel crazy busy. (Below is my favorite YouTube video on this brainpower center called the Reticular Activating System.)

4. In quiet sit, every morning, for at least 10 to 15 minutes. No phone. No TV. Just you and quiet. Try to avoid the mental to-do list. Just sit and listen and be.

5. Play with people who are fun and have fun with your kids. They aren’t always going to want you around, so if you have a craving to play, now’s the time. Picnics, nature walks, banging on pots and pans. Embrace this chance to do what other adults don’t always take the time to do – play and have fun. I used to tell myself having kids felt was like I was on vacation. And we had a lot of fun for sure.

6. Enjoy inputs that uplift – music, books, TV, movies. Uplifting generates good thoughts which drive positive emotions and actions. This is why the Hallmark Channel is so popular.

When we show up for ourselves and be the best we can be, we’re easier to be around. We don’t mind solitude, and we don’t look for people and activities outside of us to make us feel better. And, if you do feel lonely, and if you feel darkness overcomes you more often than not, please reach out to someone. You’re not alone.


Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook

Anthony Bourdain
Anthony Bourdain

It comes as no surprise  – the death of Anthony Bourdain has touched so many. Bourdain’s post-chef career as a food writer, author, and travel show host was launched by his writing, Don’t Eat Before Reading This, published in The New Yorker in April 1999.

Shortly after this no-name chef told his story about what happens behind closed doors in restaurants, he was offered a contract for his first book Kitchen Confidential. The rest, as they say, was history.

What captivated me was his willingness to go where most wouldn’t dare. His honest, descriptive, and shocking appraisals of life in a restaurant kitchen weren’t liked by all, but, by and large, his I-don’t-give-a-flying-you-know-what attitude and the sheer act of being himself created fans who loved and admired him for writing like he talked and being who he was.

Bourdain, interviewed on the occasion of his 60th birthday for First We Feast quipped, “I joke about not giving a f*** being a very good business model for me,” he said, “but it’s true. The absolute certainty that nobody was going to buy or read or care about Kitchen Confidential was what allowed me to write it. I didn’t have to think about what people expected. I didn’t care. And as a result, I was able to write this book quickly and without tormenting myself. And that seemed to work out and I learned from that experience and I tried very hard. Whether I’m meeting with a group of television executives or telling a story, I don’t think about ‘the fans’; I don’t think about what audiences expect, and I’m not afraid of what will they think of me, or what if they don’t like it and I’m not on television anymore.” And then the kicker, the thing that got the audience pumping, “You know, I’ll go back to brunch….. I don’t care.”

Here’s what I think is the saddest part of the whole turn of events this past week with Bourdain, and even in the same light, Kate Spade.  His fan’s love and admiration for him, and his bad-boy ways, wasn’t enough to overcome the darkness and despair, and maintain the energy required to continue to live life as he knew it.  So, he made the decision to leave it all, including a sweet 11-year old daughter.

My hope and belief is that he is now at peace connected to Love in a way that none of us have ever experienced. I for one would love to know what he really thinks about this “place”. For if there’s one mortal person I know I could count on for the full report it’s Anthony Bourdain.


Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

Do you feel

Going LIVE!
Going LIVE!

If there is one change I made to my business (and personal life) during the past year that made a huge difference for me and my clients (and family) it would be “going live”.

When you’re LIVE people can see you on camera. There is more connection, engagement, communication.

So, in the past 12 months, I’ve had

  • LIVE Mastermind Groups
  • LIVE 1:1 Coaching Calls
  • LIVE WeChat calls with my son in Austria
  • LIVE group video calls with my siblings
  • LIVE Cookbook Writing Q & A calls for members of my email list

LIVE is risky. Not only can people hear us, but they can see us. We put ourselves and our faces out there.

LIVE is so good. Plus it’s fun and connects me with clients and family like never before.

As a result of LIVE broadcasts, masterminds, and coaching I tripled my coaching and mastermind client load over the past 12 months.

And, LIVE gets easier and easier the more I do.

Next, I plan to offer LIVE webinars, Q & A Calls, and Facebook or YouTube LIVE to promote my work to a larger audience.

How much LIVE work are you doing in your business?

If you said not much, I challenge you to take the time to LIVE.


Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

Checklist
An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

Cookbook Writing Workbook

What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

A New Way to Set Goals
A New Way to Set Goals

This morning I’m in New York City. I plan to visit Kitchen Arts and Letters bookstore (actually cookbook and food book store!) and visit the 911 Memorial. This afternoon I’ll head over to Book Expo America and tomorrow I sign galley copies of my two new cookbooks.

Set Goals From Abundance

I’m sure you have all set goals.

One way I learned to set goals was to write goals that were SMART – specific, measurable, actionable, realistic, and time-sensitive.

This method of goal setting focuses on lack. I’m here. My goal is there. We are separated until I reach my goal. For me this may lead to striving and putting my goal on a pedestal. That creates distance from the goal and it seems out of reach at least to me.

My business coach taught me to write goals in a new way.

Write them as if you already have them.

And, here’s the key – mix in goals you already have achieved.

For example:

I want a happy, loving marriage. I have a happy, loving marriage.
I want three healthy children. I have three healthy children.
I want to be a homeowner. I have a lovely, cozy home.
I want to save money for retirement. I have saved money for retirement.
I want clients I adore and that I can serve. I have clients I adore and that I can serve.
I want a healthy relationship with my mother and mother-in-law. I have a healthy relationship with my mother and mother-in-law.
I want to be an involved part of a large, extended family that I have fun with. I am an involved part of a large, extended family that I have fun with.
I want friends I love to spend time with. I have friends I love to spend time with.
I want to have freedom of time and good health. I have freedom of time and good health.
I want to write cookbooks. I have written four cookbooks.
I want to be a member of Les Dames Escoffier. I have an invitation to Les Dames!
I want a positive attitude based on my deliberate thoughts. I have a positive attitude based on my deliberate thoughts.
I want a business built around cookbooks. I have a business built around cookbooks.
I want to create value and a variety of offerings for my clients. I create value and offer services to my clients in a variety of ways.
I want to create a cookbook writers mastermind group. I have a cookbook writers mastermind group.
I want to have high-end private coaching clients. I have high-end coaching clients.
I want to leverage my expertise with book-writing software. I leverage my expertise with book-writing software.
I want the freedom to travel with my family. I have the freedom to travel with my family.
I want to believe that I can do anything if I show up to offer value and serve. I believe that I can do anything if I show up …

5 Tips for Energy Management
5 Tips for Energy Management

The older I get the more I realize how important my energy level is.

I’m not talking about 5-Hour Energy drinks or extreme coffee consumption, I’m talking about natural feel-good energy.

Because when I have energy, I’m more positive, appreciative, and focused. A better version of me. My business benefits. My family benefits. My clients benefit. And most importantly, when I feel good I offer value all around.

Here are a few of my “secrets”  to energy management:

1. Adequate sleep. With teens out driving around, I set a curfew for them, and adjust my sleep. No excuses or stories. This was key even when they were little and waking me up at night.

2. Intentional hydration with water

3. Limited sugar, white flour, alcohol, and caffeine. (And Peeps, chocolate bunnies, and Opera Cream eggs.🐣)

4. Lot’s of fresh veggies, whole-grains, and high-quality protein from fish, legumes, lean beef, chicken, and tofu.

5. Some sort of body movement every day: walk the dog, head to the gym, take the steps, dance in the kitchen (the kids love this), vacuum the house.

Some think this doesn’t sound like “fun”. But I’ll tell you what’s fun.

Feeling energetic and patient.

Feeling physically good in my body – no aches or pains.

Having the energy to wake up earlier than the rest of the house to think and focus.

Getting in the zone while my kids are in school and then focus on the family after 3:00 pm.

That’s my prescription for energy.

And here’s the best part – it works for kids too! And you should see what happens then.


Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

Checklist
An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

Cookbook Writing Workbook

What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

How To Write A Cookbook Revisited
How To Write A Cookbook Revisited

If you have been following me here on this blog for any time, you may know I can pretty easily rattle off the action steps to write a cookbook.

  • Identify your goals for publication
  • Define your cookbook concept
  • Evaluate routes to publication
  • Build your author platform
  • Check you commitment
  • Study your competition
  • Write a cookbook proposal
  • Shop for an agent or editor
  • Sign a contract OR
  • Decide to self-publish
  • Write your cookbook manuscript
  • Publish your book
  • Market your new book
  • If you want to read all about this action on my blog, click here.

Sounds simple right.

Actually, it is pretty cut and dry.

It’s easy to talk about action. Just do this. Then do that. Follow the steps. Write and publish your cookbook.

Then our brains seize up. Our brain wants to protect us and it sees change as scary.

We feel:

  • Scared of putting ourselves “out there. People won’t like me or my ideas.
  • Uncomfortable when we sit down to work. I don’t like putting my ideas on paper.
  • Uncertain of our ability. I’ve never done this before.
  • Overwhelmed. I have so much to do.
  • Confused. What concept should I write about? I have so many ideas.
  • Self-doubt. I’m not a “real” writer am I?.

Here’s the best news I have for you today: You can’t write a cookbook from there with a brain trying to control the show. If you feel this way, follow my Revised Steps To Write A Cookbook.

Step 1:
Expect to feel scared, uncomfortable, and uncertain.

Yes, you heard me right: expect these negative emotions.

Be aware then when they show up, you have a choice to either curl up in a ball and hit the snooze button, or to get up, get out, and take action on your dreams. These negative emotions I like to call “dream currency” emotions. They are the price we pay to grow and evolve into the person we want to be. Writing a book is new and evolves us as people. We grow into our work as writers and authors action by action.

Every time (and I mean every time) I start a new project my brain does this. It tells me that what I have in mind isn’t a good idea.

The secret is not to let your brain win. Don’t let fear, discomfort, or uncertainty stand between you and what you want to do. Instead, say to your brain, “I’m on to you and you’re not getting in the way of my dreams. Let’s get to work.” Then, as if by magic, the fear, discomfort, and lack of confidence start to lessen just a bit as we take action. We make progress. Then, the negative emotions lessen more and our brains quiet down. The best thing is that we know that we have our own back. We show up for ourselves no matter how scared, uncomfortable, or how uncertain we feel. That’s huge.

Step 2:
Stop thinking (and talking) about the overwhelm, confusion, or

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 14
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 14

FAMILY COOKBOOKS
When you embark on a family cookbook, a traditional publisher isn’t your goal. You most likely want to either self-publish a cookbook or you may turn to cookbook and recipe software online. Here’s a review of The Best Cookbook and Recipe Software of 2018.

COOKBOOK WRITING
Many of my cookbook-writing clients ask about the difference between their cookbook introduction and their cookbook concept overview in their cookbook proposal. While they are very similar, the biggest difference is the audience:

Cookbook Introduction audience is the reader. You sell them what the book is about, who you are, and make them buy your book!

Cookbook Concept Overview audience is the agent or editor. You sell them on representing you and publishing your idea.

Here are a few articles on Cookbook Introductions:
Cookbook Introductions: How to Write One and Why You Should Read Them

How to Write a Cookbook Introduction

Here is advice on how to write a cookbook proposal that attracts agents and publishers.

MY ADVICE ABOUT CONTENT IS CONSISTENCY
As a writer and business owner, I talk a lot about creating content as a cornerstone of a successful business.

Content is about offering your audience value and helping them. Give them something they like – a tip, recipe, mindset shift.

Now, here’s the rub: no matter how you deliver this  – via post, podcast, newsletter, print media, YouTube, or other social media platform, the one key to it all is consistency.

Here are my 5 secrets to create consistent content.

COOKBOOK NEWS
Ina Garten’s 11th cookbook is coming out in October. She feels lucky to be writing cookbooks. She keeps notes on what she wants to cooks. She works with flavors and combinations and cooks what she loves. That sounds like a recipe for success to me.

Have you heard about ckbk an online site to search, save, and share from an online database of cookbooks launching in Spring 2018? I have heard it called the Spotify for recipes. Visit ckbk.com to learn more.

And, finally, as if we need to buy more cookbooks, here is a list of 10 Books About Food To Add To Your Home Library, presented by eater.com.


Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

Checklist
An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write

How To Love Your Brain
How To Love Your Brain

 

I don’t know about you, but my brain tends to stay on all the time.

It controls what I do and much to my amusement, it tries to control other people! That’s so funny because I don’t always do what my brain wants me to do, yet I spend time actually thinking about what everyone else “should” be doing.

The reality is: Our brains keep our legs moving, hearts beating, and fingers typing.

It secretes hormones, gives off nerve impulses and helps me remember my name, where I live, and what I am going to cook for dinner tonight.

In addition, my brain generates over 60,000 thoughts a day. Maybe you can relate? Thoughts about about injuries while my son plays sports, my kids grades, my son in Austria, shifts in my business, dirt on the kitchen floor, how my dog snores, cookbook sales, weeds in our yard no one was addressing, hair on the bathroom floor, errands I need to run, what someone said to me in that text message, what I thought that text  message meant, and how I need to generate a topic for my next newsletter.

My brain’s higher function can plan parties, make decisions for my business and believe it or not, even talks me out of my dream goals by telling me to stay safe, eat M&M’s, and watch Netflix. (In other words, be comfortable, Maggie. You’ve done enough.)

I really started thinking about this and came to the conclusion that we never really learn how to take care of our brains. We read a lot about how to care for our heart, skin, and lungs. Our legs, abs, and hair.When we do read about our brains, the focus is on staying sharp, preventing aging, and Alzheimer’s disease.

But what about all the other stuff our brain does for us as the amazing living, breathing, thinking machines that we humans are?

Then, I asked my brain this question,”What have I done for you lately?”

Here’s what my brain said: “you sometimes feed me crappy foods, you often think crappy thoughts, we hydrate with crappy drinks, you short-cut sleep, and we start our my day at 90 MPH, as soon as your feet hit the floor.” Wow. Nothing like a bit of brain honesty.

As a result of this conversation with my brain, I decided to experiment with brain love and care. My goal was to see how my brain responded to special loving treatment.  Here’s how the experiment went.

I decided to feed my brain better. This is naturally where dietitians start  – with nourishing food. So, to honor my brain, I fed it less peanut M&M’s and ice cream. (Two of my favorite sweets.) I served it less beer and wine.  (And I love red wine and a good stout beer.) I cooked it more organic vegetables, whole grains, plant-based entrees, and fish. I snacked on tasty nuts (and not Kettle chips), and blended morning smoothies with dark berries and green …

How To Trust Yourself
How To Trust Yourself

 

My daughter moved home from college over the weekend. She lived in her freshman dorm for eight months and had a great first year. I feel excited about our summer together and it’s good to have her home.

Today I’ve been thinking a lot about trust. Maybe as a first-time writer, parent, or business owner, you can relate to this.

Several years ago I really wanted to write a cookbook. I would schedule time on my calendar to write the table of contents for a book proposal,  record a recipe, or even test a recipe. These “scheduled times”  show up on my calendar and my brain would say, “Don’t worry about doing this. It won’t matter anyway. Plus it’s a lot of work, and it’s not going to make any difference if you do it just this once. No one will ever know.”

The sad thing is I listened to my brain.

I didn’t create.

I didn’t write.

I did this over and over. There was a time when the work I needed to do for my first cookbook wouldn’t get done, again.

I felt sluggish. I indulged in self-loathing. I didn’t do what I said I was going to do.

Instead of owning up to the truth of what was going on, I excused myself from myself with you’re really busy, feeling tired, or are confused about what to do.

And the more I told myself that I was busy, tired, or confused, the more my world showed me evidence that I was tired, busy, or confused. They cycle continued. I less I showed up for myself, and the less I showed up the fewer tasks related to dreams were accomplished.

Maybe this sounds familiar?

I’d do anything for my kids, and for my clients. I show up for them, on time. I buy them healthy food, cook for them, feed them. I deliver projects to my clients on time, and when I drove my kids around, I delivered them to their activities on time. I don’t expect my kids or clients to be perfect. I help them with kindness and compassion. I commit to them, and for sure I do what I say I’m going to do. A natural result of this is that my kids and my clients trust me.

How come I couldn’t trust me? Why when I scheduled time for myself, I didn’t show up?

After some introspection, I was onto myself.

I could see the gap between where I was and where I wanted to be.

I was in reality over here: making plans to write and create content, but instead, my brain was over there: telling me to do everything for everyone, and telling me I was too tired, confused, or busy for myself.

In order to make permanent changes, the first thing I had to do was decide to become a person who could trust myself. I knew I had it in me, and my decision to grow started everything.…

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 13
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 13

BRAIN TRAINING
When I travel I like to ask my brain how I can offer value in my business for my clients. With the change of scenery it comes up with lots of ideas.

Have you ever tried to ask your brain a specific question? My business coach taught me to direct my brain. She says an undirected brain is like an unsupervised toddler. It can get into trouble.

Brains that are unattended like to worry or ruminate on made up stories about what we think others are thinking.

Direct your brain: How can I best use my time today? What is the one thing I can do to offer more value for my clients? How can I help my audience get results ahead of time? What is a new way to offer information of value to my audience? Try it. Your brain is amazing. Put it to work for you, not against you.

SPRING 2018 COOKBOOKS
Spring is one of the prime seasons for publishing cookbooks!

Here are some links to Spring 2018 Cookbook Reviews:
Spring 2018 Cookbook Preview: The 37 New Cookbooks to Buy This Spring

Every Spring 2018 Cookbook That Matters

The 18 Spring Cookbooks We’re Most Excited About

17 New Spring Cookbooks We Can’t Wait to Stain

 

Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

Checklist
An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

Cookbook Writing Workbook

What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

5 Secrets to Consistent Content Creation
5 Secrets to Consistent Content Creation

One of my superpowers is creating consistent content for my business.

*Regular blog posts since 2010

*Four cookbooks since 2011

*Weekly newsletters since 2012

Do you struggle with regular content creation? Do you start strong with a good idea for a book, blog, or newsletter, but then fizzle out and lack consistency in the producing of the blog posts, newsletters, or cookbooks?

Consistency is king. Customers like consistency. It’s trustworthy. Publishers like consistency. It’s dependable. Your readers like consistency. They want to hear from you. They like what you write about.

In order to help you move from struggling and overwhelmed, I want to share my five secrets to consistent content creation.

1. Decide if you want to create consistent content. You can do this if you want to. If your answer is yes, then let’s do it! If your answer is no, that’s ok. Quit beating yourself up and move on to another way to spend your time.

2. Pick one day and a specific time: I write newsletter and blog post content once a week on Mondays. I spend no more than two hours to do this. I get it done and don’t have to worry about the newsletter or blog post until the next Monday. On Mondays, my sweet spot is between the hours of  8 – 10 am. I set myself up for success. I don’t schedule phone calls during this time. I don’t run errands during this time. I don’t go get coffee with a friend during this time. This time is for my content. Each and every Monday morning. For you, it might be midnight – 2 am. The time doesn’t matter. Just pick a time where you are awake, alert, focused. And I hear what you’re thinking: but I’ve got little kids, I have a job, I have so much to do, I’m so busy. If that’s the case, go back to #1 and decide.

3. Get yourself in a good feeling place before you write. I like to show up on Mondays (and every day, quite frankly) refreshed and ready. For me, this means I have completed my morning routine and I’m cleaned up for the day. I can’t produce when I’m sitting around feeling and smelling like I just crawled out of bed. I work better when I’m clean, dressed, smell good, and my household tasks that I do on Monday mornings are underway.

4. Show up at your computer or laptop. Sit down (or stand up if you want to), and write (or create). By the time I actually sit down, I have a topic in mind to write about. These topics pop into my head in a variety of ways, but most often they occur to me during my morning routine. (This routine is a no-brainer and consists of some quiet coffee time, breakfast with my son, clean up the kitchen, shower, and morning notebook time.) You’d be amazed how many ideas pop into my head when I’m focused …