Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 16
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 16

It’s time for my monthly Cookbook and Food Writing Links issue. But first, a message about the app I use to save links to articles I want to share in this newsletter.

How do I keep track of the articles? I use Pocket app, or the Chrome extension also called Pocket. Previously known as Read It Later, Pocket manages my reading list of articles. When I want to save a link, I share to Pocket from my iPhone and/or desktop Chrome extension. I can even tag the article. The article link is synced across all devices for reading anywhere. Ads and other screen clutter are removed from the article. The tagging assists with future sort and search. I highly recommend it.

COOKBOOKS
Cooking and Sci-Fi Are the Hot Print Segments This Year So Far

GOOGLE DOODLE
Back in March, I must have missed this Google doodle where for the first time, a cookbook writer was featured in the daily doodle to celebrate her 310th birthday. Hannah Glasse, born in 1708 and an English cookbook writer wrote The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy in 1747. Her popular book hailed 972 recipes and was written in simple and conversational English.

BUSINESS ADVICE
Kathleen Tale, the owner of Tate’s Bake Shop, offers advice for small business owners, that she learned through the opening and eventually loss of her first venture, Kathleen’s Bake Shop. When it comes to starting a small business, she says, count on it being four times harder than you dreamed — perseverance is key, and so is getting up, moving forward, and not staying attached to mistakes and failures. She said she learned the hard way that you can care, but getting too emotional will crush you.”

KITCHEN ARTS AND LETTERS
Food & Drink Bookseller, Kitchen Arts & Letters in NYC writes a nice newsletter and blog. They recently featured their Fall 2018 Notable Cookbooks article as well as a post on Classic Cookbooks People Won’t Even Look At (because of no photos). KAL also notes that in their observation there is a lack of professional pastry books written by women. Home baking, by the way, is ripe with female authors and professional female chefs who write about both savory topics, and home baking, but not professional baking. An opportunity here maybe?

MOST POPULAR BLOG POSTS ON GREENAPRON.COM
(wait for it)
Steps to Write A Cookbook: Write A Cookbook Proposal
4 Ways to Find a Traditional Cookbook Publisher
5 Tools and Software for Writing a Family or Fundraiser Cookbook 
Oven-Baked Chex Mix (I’m not even kidding! So popular)


Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

I’ve been

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 15
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 15

Today it’s time for my monthly roundup of links for cookbooks, writing, and productivity.

TRAVEL AND COOKBOOKS
Research about cookbooks and the stores that sell them has been on my mind lately. If you’re traveling this summer, you may enjoy this list of cookbook shops around the world.

BEST COOKBOOKS
Here’s a list of the best baking cookbooks according to pastry chefs and professional bakers.

And a list of the 25 Best-Selling Cookbooks of All Time.

SELF PUBLISHING
Check out Ingram Spark if you want to self-publish a hard-cover, full-color photography cookbook. With the Ingram distribution behind them, your cookbook can be easily be ordered by bookstores for signing and author events. They also have a podcast called Go Publish Yourself, offer a Pocket Guide to Publishing, and courses on the Ingram Spark Academy.

RESTAURANT TRENDS
Exploring the effect of social media on restaurants and hospitality, and the difference between “casual” restaurants, restaurants change and adapt to movements in technology and the needs of their customers.

PRODUCTIVITY
I’ve always loved mornings. And it seems that Mel Robbins does too. Read Mel Robbins’ approach to working on her goals, first thing in the morning.

WRITING
Here’s an interesting blog post on The Write Life featuring 20 Inspiring Pinterest Boards for Writers.


Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

Checklist
An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

Cookbook Writing Workbook

What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 14
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 14

FAMILY COOKBOOKS
When you embark on a family cookbook, a traditional publisher isn’t your goal. You most likely want to either self-publish a cookbook or you may turn to cookbook and recipe software online. Here’s a review of The Best Cookbook and Recipe Software of 2018.

COOKBOOK WRITING
Many of my cookbook-writing clients ask about the difference between their cookbook introduction and their cookbook concept overview in their cookbook proposal. While they are very similar, the biggest difference is the audience:

Cookbook Introduction audience is the reader. You sell them what the book is about, who you are, and make them buy your book!

Cookbook Concept Overview audience is the agent or editor. You sell them on representing you and publishing your idea.

Here are a few articles on Cookbook Introductions:
Cookbook Introductions: How to Write One and Why You Should Read Them

How to Write a Cookbook Introduction

Here is advice on how to write a cookbook proposal that attracts agents and publishers.

MY ADVICE ABOUT CONTENT IS CONSISTENCY
As a writer and business owner, I talk a lot about creating content as a cornerstone of a successful business.

Content is about offering your audience value and helping them. Give them something they like – a tip, recipe, mindset shift.

Now, here’s the rub: no matter how you deliver this  – via post, podcast, newsletter, print media, YouTube, or other social media platform, the one key to it all is consistency.

Here are my 5 secrets to create consistent content.

COOKBOOK NEWS
Ina Garten’s 11th cookbook is coming out in October. She feels lucky to be writing cookbooks. She keeps notes on what she wants to cooks. She works with flavors and combinations and cooks what she loves. That sounds like a recipe for success to me.

Have you heard about ckbk an online site to search, save, and share from an online database of cookbooks launching in Spring 2018? I have heard it called the Spotify for recipes. Visit ckbk.com to learn more.

And, finally, as if we need to buy more cookbooks, here is a list of 10 Books About Food To Add To Your Home Library, presented by eater.com.


Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

Checklist
An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 13
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 13

BRAIN TRAINING
When I travel I like to ask my brain how I can offer value in my business for my clients. With the change of scenery it comes up with lots of ideas.

Have you ever tried to ask your brain a specific question? My business coach taught me to direct my brain. She says an undirected brain is like an unsupervised toddler. It can get into trouble.

Brains that are unattended like to worry or ruminate on made up stories about what we think others are thinking.

Direct your brain: How can I best use my time today? What is the one thing I can do to offer more value for my clients? How can I help my audience get results ahead of time? What is a new way to offer information of value to my audience? Try it. Your brain is amazing. Put it to work for you, not against you.

SPRING 2018 COOKBOOKS
Spring is one of the prime seasons for publishing cookbooks!

Here are some links to Spring 2018 Cookbook Reviews:
Spring 2018 Cookbook Preview: The 37 New Cookbooks to Buy This Spring

Every Spring 2018 Cookbook That Matters

The 18 Spring Cookbooks We’re Most Excited About

17 New Spring Cookbooks We Can’t Wait to Stain

 

Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

Checklist
An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

Cookbook Writing Workbook

What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 12
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 12

$200 Cookbook

This is older news, but did you ever hear about Tom Brady’s $200 Cookbook?

He created a system and wrote a book about it. It sold out at $200. What’s stopping you from creating your system and a book for your audience?

Recipe Copyright Projection:

As a member of IACP (International Association of Culinary Professionals), I have the opportunity to attend their webinars.

Last month IACP hosted an excellent webinar presented by attorney Joy Butler.

In her webinar, Joy talked about protecting, sharing, and adapting recipes.

I thought you might enjoy her blog post that summarizes her answers to a series of questions asked on this webinar about copyright protecting for recipes.

Cookbook author and culinary dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors in the process of writing cookbooks, cookbook proposals, and building their author platform. Download her checklist “Am I Ready to Write A Cookbook?”

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 11
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 11

In our businesses and personal lives, we are either creating or consuming. I love to consume as much as the next person: social media, articles, webinars, seminars, books, cookbooks. All consuming. Taking in information.

Creating, on the other hand, produces a result. In my business, the results that I consistently produce include classes, cookbooks, webinars, mastermind groups, email marketing materials, blog posts, and recipe content.

I try to pay close attention to my consuming time VS creating time. It’s fun to consume. It’s easy to consume. I learn when I consume. But, it’s in the creating that the real work gets done, my friends.

I get really excited when I read print news about cookbooks and cookbook writing. They are fun to read and give me eternal hope for the role of the print cookbook in our kitchens.

Today I want to share a few links to cookbook news I’ve consumed recently. I hope you enjoy them, and that they ultimately lead you to create something of value for your clients and customers.

COOKBOOK CONCEPTS
Have you heard the buzz about The Immigrant Cookbook? Read this LA Time pick for Cookbook of the Week?  Also, check out the publisher of The Immigrant Cookbook: Interlink Books. They have an impressive list of International Cookery books.

COOKBOOK DEALS
Develop a concept, set yourself apart from others, find an agent, sign a book deal, and other suggestions in How to Land a Publishing For Your Cookbook by Marisa Churchill, chef and cookbook author.

I love to read the obituaries in my local paper. A little fact about me that maybe you don’t know. Cookbooks about funeral food won’t die, and in this article, you read the story about a publisher reaching out to an author to write about a trending topic.

Appliances drive topics for sales of cookbooks. Case in point: Urvashi Pitre. Butter chicken in an Instant Pot. Bingo. Cookbook deal.

COOKBOOK AUTHOR INTERVIEW
Healthyish. A cookbook that returns cooks from extremes and is written by an author with a very popular Instagram photo of a cookie. See the interview with author Lindsay Maitland Hunt by Bon Appetite Magazine. 

Cookbook author and culinary dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors in the process of writing cookbooks, cookbook proposals, and building their author platform. Download her checklist “Am I Ready to Write A Cookbook?”

Fall Cookbook Roundup
Fall Cookbook Roundup

Fall is a favorite time of year for cookbook publication, so it’s time for my annual fall cookbook roundup referencing lists from foodies websites, Publishers Weekly, and newspapers. The lists include authors who have written more than one book, I like to remember that for many of the authors this their first book. And every book starts with an idea they had about a topic related to food, cooking, or the kitchen.

And be sure to read the last link about a 19-year old who published a print food magazine.

Huffington Post
Huff Post looks foward to the end of summer with their top 10 fall cookbooks, some from food bloggers, and some from chefs who’ve written mutiple cookbooks. All give us a chance this fall to bake, cook, and slow-cook.

Epicurious
Epicurious takes a look at cookbooks as “the pendulum has swung back to home cooking, and publishers have heard the call.” Chefs and restaurants are no longer front and center of the list that Epicurious has chosen.

Eater
Eater take a look at the Biggest Restaurant Cookbooks of Fall 2017.

Publishers Weekly
PW describes their list as “eclectic” as the books address topics from work hunger to feeding the resistance.

Tasting Table
TT claims that the 37 books they’ve selected will change the way you cook.

LA Times
An “impressive” list with first books about Native American cuisine, drinking food of Thailand, and making bread.

COOKBOOK WRITING
Here’s what I call an amazing story about a 19-year old college student who wanted to write a print publication. So, she went “nerd deep” on a topic and published a magazine. Don’t ever let anyone stop you from your cookbook or print-publication dreams.

Cookbook author and culinary dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors on writing cookbooks and cookbook proposals and building their author platform. Download her checklist “Am I Ready to Write A Cookbook?”

 

 …

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 10
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 10

INSPIRATION
I’ve always loved Nora Ephron. Her book, I Feel Bad About My Neck, is too relate-able. I also love lists so was drawn to this list, written by Nora, who sadly died in 2006, but her list here is a poignant reminder of life, and what’s to be missed (or not missed) when we no longer inhabit our physical bodies.

WRITING
It’s often recommended, to be a good writer we need to be a reader. This article looks at the relationship between reading and writing.

COOKBOOKS
An argument for cookbooks as a source of recipes. Love it.

Points to the concept that a kitchen appliance provides the basis for a new cookbook. Six (6!) cookbooks are being written about the Instant Pot.

PUBLISHING
This link is to my favorite graphic about publishing, created and updated every year by Jane Friedman. This graphic is always relevant and helpful for anyone dipping their toes into the world of book publishing.

If you want an agent to represent you and shop around a proposal, here are some tips.

BOOK DESIGN
A book cover speaks volumes to your book buyer. Learn some mistakes made on book covers.

SELF-PUBLISHING
A fascinating story about self-publishing revenue.

Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. If you want to write a cookbook, and wonder if you’re ready, download her 11-point checklist Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?  Applications are now open for the next Hungry For A Cookbook Mastermind Group.

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 9
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 9

Cookbook Writing

Cookbook authors have routines they follow to help them focus and write their manuscripts. Let’s take a look at the role of music in the manuscript development of some award-winning cookbook authors.

What’s it like to write a fully illustrated and handwritten cookbook in this day and age of food photography?

Kathryn Taylor from food blog Cookie + Kate shares her tips on writing a cookbook in advance of publication of her book Love Real Food.

Here’s another blog post from Kathryn in 2015 when her cookbook project was starting and she was in the process of testing and developing recipes.

If you’ve ever considered self-publishing your cookbook, this article sheds light on both traditional and self-publishing with some $$$ attached.

Memoir Writing

I’ve recently had a few clients who want to write a food memoir based on a trip they’ve taken, places they’ve lived, and other experiences with food. Memoirs are a different type of book. The require different treatment than traditional cookbooks. Here are two links to good articles about writing memoirs:

Why Your Memoir Won’t Sell by Jane Friedman. I like almost all the advice Jane gives and this provides so great tips for those who want to write a memoir.

Roundtable discussion about writing memoirs with five literary agents. Jane refers to this article in her blog post, and even though it was from 2010 it’s full of great information.

When my clients started asking about writing food memoirs, I made a connection with four editors at traditional publishing houses (2 mid-size traditional publishers, 2 NYC large, traditional publishers.) Here is a link to my blog post with their answers to my question, “Do you recommend that my client(s) submit a manuscript for a memoir, or write a manuscript or write a book proposal?”

Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. If you want to write a cookbook, and wonder if you’re ready, download her 11-point checklist Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook? 

 …

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 8
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 8

Writing Routines

If you’ve followed me here for a while, then you maybe know by now that I live by my routines. I don’t die by them, meaning I try not to get too hung-up if something doesn’t go as planned, but the routines I have in place free me from worry that I’ve forgotten to do something and free me from pressure to do things at the last minute.

With a good routine and a weekly plan I’m able to accomplish my goals related to business, writing, family, hobbies, and social time. In this blog, Scott Myers discusses the process of writing and writing routines with various writers. I love to read about other’s routines, and I hope you enjoy this too.

AP Stylebook

When it comes to food terms, we often wonder about editorial style, italics, spelling, hyphens, and other seemingly fussy details. Every year the AP Stylebook (AP stands for Associated Press which is an association of newspapers, radio and TV stations.) includes food entries and adds new food entries that are making their way into mainstream media. The stylebook dictates how journalists, writers, and broadcasters are to “style” the terms presented in the book.

Here’s the link to an Eater article about the 2017 AP Stylebook as well as a link to the various options for buying the style book. I do like this list for two reasons: it shows me what food terms are becoming mainstream and how the AP likes to spell the terms. When we write our cookbooks, we pick our style, but it’s interesting to me to see the preferred spelling and style from the AP.

Writing Resources

On these sites you’ll find information about traditional and self-publishing, book marketing, writing, freelance opportunities, agents, copyrights, contracts, and author rights.

Publishers’ Weekly
Offers updates about all things related to publishing.

Publishers’ Marketplace
A well-known site for up-to-date information about the publishing industry. Also, available is a daily called Publishers Lunch for a subscription fee that summarizes book deals, changes in staff publishing houses, and acquisitions and mergers within the publishing industry.

The Creative Penn
Geared toward writers who are interested in writing eBooks with their various routes to publishing, as well as internet marketing and promotion for books.

Write To Done
Editor Mary Jaksch shares what she and guest bloggers have learned about writing better. This blog is for any writer looking to improve their craft and their art.

Women On Writing
WOW offers on-line writing classes and search functions for publication routes and agents. Sign-up for their e-Zine promoting the communication between women writers, their editors, their agents, and more.

Writer’s Digest
An excellent on-line resource for writers that offers blog posts, resources, and articles all about writing.

Media Bistro’s Avant Guild
Join the premium membership level AvantGuild at Media Bistro to enhance freelance writing work. For a membership fee you receive access on how to pitch articles, access to health insurance for freelancers, and discounts on classes, Freelance Marketplace, and …

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 7
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 7

This roundup, while not specific to cookbooks and food writing, contains websites and organizations for writers of all genres. On these sites you’ll find information about traditional and self-publishing, book marketing, writing, freelance opportunities, agents, copyrights, contracts, and author rights.

Publishers’ Weekly

Offers updates about all things related to publishing.

Publishers’ Marketplace

A well-known site for up-to-date information about the publishing industry. Also, available is a daily called Publishers Lunch for a subscription fee that summarizes book deals, changes in staff publishing houses, and acquisitions and mergers within the publishing industry.

The Creative Penn

Geared toward writers who are interested in writing eBooks with their various routes to publishing, as well as internet marketing and promotion for books.

Write To Done

Editor Mary Jaksch shares what she and guest bloggers have learned about writing better. This blog is for any writer looking to improve their craft and their art.

Women On Writing

WOW offers on-line writing classes and search functions for publication routes and agents. Sign-up for their e-Zine promoting the communication between women writers, their editors, their agents, and more.

Writer’s Digest

An excellent on-line resource for writers that offers blog posts, resources, and articles all about writing.

Media Bistro’s Avant Guild

Join the premium membership level AvantGuild at Media Bistro to enhance freelance writing work. For a membership fee you receive access on how to pitch articles, access to health insurance for freelancers, and discounts on classes, Freelance Marketplace, and more.

AgentQuery.com

Recognized by Writer’s Digest as one of the best websites for writers, this website provides a genre-specific searchable database of literary agents.

The Authors Guild

The Authors Guild is the nation’s oldest and largest professional organization for writers. Since its beginnings over a century ago, we have served as the collective voice of American authors.

Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. If you want to write a cookbook, and wonder if you’re ready, download her 11-point checklist Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook? 

 

 …

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 6
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 6

Cookbook News

Publisher’s Weekly shares regular and reliable information about the publishing industry. Here is there recent Preview of Cookbooks: March 2017 from Publisher’s Weekly

According to Publisher’s Weekly “It was a good year for cookbooks all around—unit print sales in the category were up 6% in 2016 over 2015.” Ina Garten’s cookbook was the best selling print cookbook in 2016 selling >400K copies since October. Bestselling Cookbooks of 2016 included: *cookbooks featuring kitchen appliances: an Instant Pot electric pressure cooker, an air fryer, and a spiralizer,
*cookbooks from authors/celebrities with robust platforms: Chrissy Teigen, Ina Garten, Anthony Bourdain, and Ree Drummond
*cookbooks for diet/health: Skinnytaste Fast and Slow.

Heidi Swanson of 101 Cookbooks got her start blogging about what she cooked from her collection of cookbooks. She added photography and her goal was that she “would learn a lot and gradually improve my writing, cooking, and photography; it would be a personal, creative outlet.” Read more about How Heidi Swanson made 101 Cookbooks.

Bowls are the new plate? Lots of bowl cookbooks being written.

We are obsessed with food. In Australia, four of the five bestselling books related to food and nutrition. This in an interesting article, from Huff Post Australia that claims Cookbooks Aren’t Going To Solve Our Health Problems.

Lucky Peach’s list of cookbooks you need when you must create an “impressive feast”.

Productivity

If you’re anything like me, you write lists, maintain ongoing lists, and refer to lists that pertain to both business and personal life. Examples of lists I write or refer to regularly include shopping, errands, phone calls, grocery, gratitude, tasks to complete, recipes to test, recipes to develop, people/situations to pray for, goals, projects, bills to pay, passwords, and birthdays. In the management of these lists, I vacillate between lists maintained in my daily planner (handwritten), a notebook (handwritten), as well as Scrivener, Drafts, Dashlane, WorkFlowy, and Excel (electronic).

So far, my mixed system of handwritten lists and electronically maintained lists works for me. I measure my success with the ability to find what I need when I need it, and the ability to access the list in a cross-platform way, especially with the electronic lists.

Despite these systems functioning well, I always tend to go back to handwritten for certain tasks or when I need to make a brain dump and sort and organize the things I have on my mind.

This is an interesting article about how hand-writing to-do lists helps your brain, and who does’t need a boost in brain power?

 

Cookbook author and culinary dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors in the process of writing cookbooks, cookbook proposals, and building their author platform. Download her checklist “Am I Ready to Write A Cookbook?”

Food Trends 2017
Food Trends 2017

It’s time for my annual Food Trends update, this time of course focusing on predictions and trends for 2017 in food, nutrition, restaurants, and ingredients.

I find the focus on regional American cuisines and plant-based eating refreshing as well as the return to home cooked meals for Generation Z. This is a lot to digest, but included are some nice links to PDFs from Sterling-Rice Group, Baum + Whiteman, and the National Restaurant Association’s What’s Hot Culinary Forecast for 2017, as well as a list from Global Food Forums, that they keep updated as new lists and trend reports are published.

Global Food Forums: 2017 Food Trends
Top trend lists in food, beverage, and nutritional product trends for 2017

National Restaurant Association: What’s Hot 2017 Culinary Forecast

Sterling-Rice Groups: 10 Cutting Edge Culinary Trends for 2017

NPD: Predictions for 2017 and Beyond

Washington Post: Plant proteins, healthy fats and more 2017 food trends

Tasting Table: Our predictions for the most delicious food and drink tends of the year

Eater: Every Single Food Trend That’s Been Predicted for 2017

Kim Severson: The Dark (and Often Dubious Art of Forecasting Food Trends)

Linked-in David Craig: 2017 Food Trends Roundup

Oldways: Five Food Trends to Make 2017 The Best Year Ever

QSR: 12 Fast Food Trends for 2017

International Food Information Council Foundation: Functional foods, sustainability, protein, CRISPR, What’s Healthy

Baum + Whiteman International Food + Restaurant Consultants:
13 Hottest Food & Beverage Trends in Restaurant & Hotel Dining for 2017

Cookbook author and culinary dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors in the process of writing cookbooks, cookbook proposals, and building their author platform. Download her checklist “Am I Ready to Write A Cookbook?”

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 5
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 5

 

FOOD TRENDS

One of my favorite resources for food trends is Allecipes’ Measuring Cup Consumer Trend Report. This report provides information from the Allrecipes group of home cooks such as how they shop, cook, and eat. Using intense databases and online information gathering, Allrecipes has the unique ability to gather information related to the online activity of their users. Here’s a link to their September 2016 report on Back to Kitchen trends.

Also, don’t forget to follow my Food Trends Pinterest board and watch FPS for my annual Food Trends roundup in January 2017.

COOKBOOK CONTRACTS

I hope you enjoyed last week’s Fall Cookbook Roundup. If you missed it, you could read the blog post here.

Last week I signed two new cookbook contracts, so I’m getting ready to write cookbook #3 and #4!  I love new projects, and the process of writing a cookbook is one of my strengths. I think I’ve mentioned this before, but for me, it’s easier for me to put together a cookbook manuscript than it is to maintain a food blog. The advantage of a cookbook project is that I get to do what I’m good at (develop, write, and test recipes) and let others help me with the rest (such as photography, design, and production). In addition, a cookbook project is finite, and there is a financial reward. I feel the excitement to get started on the research for the cookbooks.

With the signing of the contracts fresh in my mind, I thought I’d share a blog post and tool that relate to contracts and manuscripts.

First, here is a blog post with 6 Tips to Negotiate a Traditional Cookbook Contract. This blog post is NOT professional legal advice because I am not an attorney or an agent. So, if you’re unsure about the way this relates to your specific situation, then I advise you to seek professional legal advice.

Just like my last cookbook, I plan to use Scrivener as a tool to write the manuscripts. My favorite feature is the way the data is managed in smaller files until it’s compiled, along with the addition of metadata to sort the work I need to do. Here’s a nice video on the basics of Scrivener in case it might be of interest to you when you write a manuscript.

Cookbook author and culinary dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors in the process of writing cookbooks, cookbook proposals, and building their author platform. Download her checklist “Am I Ready to Write A Cookbook?”

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 4
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 4

 

BOOK MARKETING

My 2nd cookbook, Tasting Kentucky: Favorite Recipes from the Bluegrass State continues to keep me busy. Most marketing efforts for this book are up to me. Every week I schedule time to contact new sales and signing leads and to follow-up on activities from the previous weeks.

One of my go-to resources for topics related to writing, publishing, and marketing is Joanna Penn, of The Creative Penn. You can read here her thoughts on marketing or if you’re interested buy her book, How to Market a Book where she discusses marketing principles, prerequisites for success, short-term marketing concepts, author platforms,and book launches.

WRITING ADVICE

November is #NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month). While this newsletter is about writing cookbooks, there are similarities between writing novels and cookbooks. As part of a #NaNoWriMo promotion, I became aware of this complimentary copy of The Ultimate Guide to Writing Advice

AUTHOR PLATFORMS

It takes time to build an author platform. It also takes time to write a cookbook proposal or manuscript. In this blog post, Chad R. Allen answers the question How Do I Write My Book and Build a Platform at the Same Time?

If you have questions about what an author platform is and how to build one, read my blog post and download the Build Your Author Platform worksheet.

FOOD TRENDS

We’re nearing the end of the calendar year and food trends for 2017 are starting to emerge. Reading about these trends is something I always enjoy. In the article written for Foodservice Equipment and Supplies, six trends are identified that “may move from cutting edge to mainstream.”

Follow my Food Trends board on Pinterest.

Cookbook author and culinary dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors in the process of writing cookbooks, cookbook proposals, and building their author platform. Download her checklist “Am I Ready to Write A Cookbook?”

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 3
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 3

 

Cookbook Writing

Many readers of my weekly newsletter, Fork, Pen, & Spoon, ask what are the specific steps to write a cookbook? In response to their question, I’ve written blog posts that include worksheets to guide you on the steps to start your cookbook project. Here is a summary of the topics covered so far:

· WHO is you cookbook audience
· WHY are you writing a cookbook
· WHAT is your cookbook concept
· HOW to you want to publish your cookbook

Take some time to link to the blog posts, download the worksheets, and identify your who, why, what, and how before we move to step #4.

Food Photography

Dark and moody describes the style of many images used in cookbooks, on food blogs, and in Instagram posts. Want to photograph dark and moody?

Writing

Whether you’re writing a blog post, newsletter, poem, or book, it takes courage to share what you write with others because they decide if they like what you write or not. Many fear this judgement and never write the blog posts, newsletter, poems, or books their audience needs to read. If you struggle with writing because you fear vulnerability, you may enjoy this article from Purpose Fairy that takes a look at courage and vulnerability.

Author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. If you want to write a cookbook, and wonder if you’re ready, download her 11-point checklist Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?

How Often Should You Blog?
How Often Should You Blog?

I’ve often told my coaching clients that I think it’s easier to write a book than it is to blog. Writing a book is finite, while blogging is infinite. Writing a book doesn’t require photography, at least not photography that I take. Writing a book will hopefully require photography, but I get to leave that job to the photographer. That’s not a skill set I’ve mastered yet. And my list of reasons goes on and on. Despite my reasons, a food blog is a good way to:

· test your writing skills
· gauge your commitment to a topic
· build the hub for your platform
· attract a larger audience
· gather email addresses so you can stay in touch with your audience

woman with laptop typingOne question many food bloggers have is how often to write a blog post. Today, I link to this blog post How often should you blog?. In this article, statistics are presented about how often food bloggers are posting content as of June 2016. The most amazing stat I read here was that:

“5% of bloggers were posting more than 10 posts a week on average. In descending order: I Am Baker, Serious Eats, Skinny Ms, $5Dinners, Six Sisters Stuff, Foodista, Lil’ Luna, Maangchi, Baking Bites and Gemma’s Bigger Bolder Baking.”

So, if you have a food blog I thought you might find this post interesting and helpful.

Author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. If you want to write a cookbook, and wonder if you’re ready, download her 11-point checklist Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook? 

Routines and Rituals Links
Routines and Rituals Links

It’s this time of the year that my work feels different. The pull of sunshine, warm air, and family activities that during the summer can kept me away from my desk, writing, and work have diminished or returned to school. During this time of the year, I return to familiar routines to write this newsletter and blog posts, develop recipes, and schedule cookbook marketing activities. When I read about how other writers and business owners manage their routines, I feel inspired with a peek into their routines. Several years ago, Darren Rowse at Problogger.net wrote the article 14 Bloggers Share Their Daily Blogging Routine.

To stay on top of my work and writing it’s important to remember the tips they offer that help me keep my routine intact. My goal is to work on creating content every day for my newsletter, blog posts, programs, and cookbook projects.

· Write during my brain’s best time. This is different for everyone, but many prefer morning.
· Turn off email and social media while working.
· Work in 2 to 3 hour blocks of time.
· Devote each day to a different activity related to business or writing.
· Schedule blog posts in advance.
· Create and work from an editorial calendar or plan.
· Compartmentalize activities so they don’t bleed into family time.

daily ritualsAlong these same lines, this books is a favorite of mine. Author Mason Currey reviews the daily rituals of 161 creatives while looking at their rituals (and their obstacles) to doing the work they love to do. Daily Rituals: How Artists Work by Mason Currey

I also want to share Extraordinary Routines and their Instagram feed and their blog. I love the interviews here as well at tips for creating a routine for your creative work.

 

 

 

Author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. If you want to write a cookbook, and wonder if you’re ready, download her 11-point checklist Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook? 

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 2
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 2

Whether you write articles, newsletters, books, or blog posts, it takes discipline to sit down and write. There are so many other things I know I could be doing right now rather than writing this newsletter. The sun shines. The air is cool. My flowers need a drink of water. I’m hungry. I’m tired of sitting. I need some tea. My kitchen floor needs to be swept. And what about that good idea I had for a new project, maybe I will do some research?

1. If you’re like me, you have a lot going on and perhaps many writing tasks that need to be done on different parts of your work. Here are 5 Steps You Can Take Today to Organize Your Writing Life.

2. If you ever think of self-publishing your book (meaning you wear every hat in the publishing process) you’ll enjoy this review of  5 Must Read Blogs for Self-Publishing Authors.

3. It’s not unusual to hear writers complain about writing. Complain about agents. Complain about publishing. This article takes a look at positives of being a published writer from the perspective of Amber Lee Easton, from Mountain Moxie Publishing and Creative Services.

4. This article is over a year old, but stirred up a great debate recently in a Facebook group I belong to. If you write recipes, you might enjoy this article (from the UK) about recipes using volume VS weight.

Author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. If you want to write a cookbook, and wonder if you’re ready, download her 11-point checklist Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 1
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 1

 

1. Achieving a goal such as writing a cookbook isn’t always about talent, physical looks, TV shows, or hundreds of thousands of social media followers. More than these what can help someone achieve a big goal are the habits they practice on a daily basis. Here’s an article I enjoyed about 8 Habits More Important to Success Than Raw Talent.

2. When writing a cookbook we need to define the audience for our book and recipes. Is the audience kids, retirees, or teens? Maybe it’s young moms, single parents, or the DIY crowd. This recent Bon Appetit article brings to light the Millennial generation (born early 1980’s to early 2000’s) and their focus on food. Maybe they are the audience for your cookbook?

3. Is food writing becoming a “men’s club”? Kathleen Purvis explores this topic in her recent article and study of the pre-dominance of male voices in 21st century Southern food writing.

4. Santa Monica’s Huckleberry Bakery owner Zoe Nathan wrote a cookbook that was published in 2014. I love this article about her experience writing a cookbook.  When she wrote her cookbook she enlisted the help of recipe testers mainly because she had to scale the recipes to home-size quantities. Her honesty about “winging it” while writing a cookbook provides a lesson in willingness to just do the work even if you don’t always know exactly what you’re doing. I also like her discussion about life balance while writing her cookbook, raising a family, and operating the bakery. The truth is that more often than not cookbook authors lead busy lives in a kitchen and find time to write their books in spite of other things going on in their lives.

5. Cookbook publisher Phaidon plans to release three vegetarian cookbooks this spring. This interview with Emilia Terragni at Phaidon reveals why they are publishing vegetarian cookbooks.

6. And for fun, here’s the Epicurious’ Spring Cookbook roundup for 2016.

Below are a few links to popular posts on this blog about writing cookbooks that you many have missed:

5 Myths about Writing a Cookbook

4 Ways to Find a Traditional Cookbook Publisher

5 Tools and Software for Writing a Family or Fundraiser Cookbook

Q&A: How Do I Write a Cookbook Proposal that Attracts Agents and Publishers?

Is My Cookbook Concept Good Enough?

10 Reasons to Hire a Cookbook Coach

Author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. If you want to write a cookbook, and wonder if you’re ready, download her 11-point checklist Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?