Writing a Cookbook Proposal - 5 Tips for Success
Writing a Cookbook Proposal - 5 Tips for Success

Every cookbook needs to have a specific audience defined. Be it men, women, school-age children, older adults, newly retired executives, experienced cooks, newlyweds, home chefs, or bakers, your cookbook needs to speak to a specific audience. When you keep this audience in mind, your message will be on-target and the audience won’t believe how much they can learn from you and how much you can help them. So what about when you write your cookbook proposal? Who do you write that for?

When you write your cookbook proposal, the target audience is not the same audience as your cookbook. Your proposal audience is an agent and/or an editor at a publishing house. Your job in a cookbook proposal is to speak to that agent and/or editor and WOW them with your cookbook idea. Your proposal not only packages, but delivers, your cookbook concept in a neat, clear, concise, and hopefully unforgettable, document. Think of your proposal as a tool to educate someone about your book idea. If they read the proposal they’ll know everything they need to know about you and your awesome cookbook idea. So, how can you do this?

Here are 5 tips for success with your cookbook proposal.

1. When you write your proposal always keep agents and editors in mind. Answer any question you think they would have about you, your topic, your platform, and your book idea. You are selling your book idea to them. You want them to lay awake at night and think of your cookbook idea and how you are the best person to write about this idea.

2. The proposal must showcase your best writing skills. This is done through how you write the proposal and how you express yourself in you book’s introduction, sample chapter, and in the several tested recipes you provide. Make your proposal an enjoyable read. Through your writing, and the way you express yourself in the proposal, the agent and/or editor must get an example of your ability to write clearly. Convince them of your ability to deliver your cookbook concept through your narrative and recipes.

3. When formatting your proposal check to see if your agent and/or the publishing house where you plan to submit offers style guidelines to format the proposal. If they have guidelines be sure to  follow them to a “T”. If guidelines are not available, format the proposal in 12-point, double-spaced, Times New Roman font, or another widely acceptable font- style. Include a footer with page numbers and 1-inch margins. Skip elaborate design and stylized fonts unless you have a compelling reason to do so. Avoid  “fluffing” up a proposal with fancy binding or random food images unless you want to include sample photography. Keep the proposal simple and keep it focused.

4. Make sure your proposal is clear, to the point, well-formatted, and free of spelling and grammatical errors.  If writing and grammar is not your skill, partner with a collaborator, but disclose the collaboration to the agent/editor so they …

3 Ways To Not Write A Cookbook
3 Ways To Not Write A Cookbook

Over the past several years I’ve enjoyed coaching clients who want to write their first cookbook. They come to me in all stages of cookbook desire, but what they all have in common is that they’ve never written a cookbook before and they have a ton of questions about where to start and how to get published.  In my programs and private coaching we work through the questions and the obstacles they face. Most of them make good progress on their projects and hone in on their cookbook concept and content. I’m so proud that an attendee of a recent program signed her first cookbook contract. Through the program they learned the essential ingredients of writing a cookbook and when the request for a proposal came she kicked into action and wrote her proposal. Now that the proposal has been accepted, she’s working on a deadline to complete her manuscript.

The secret to her success has been all about taking action. She took a class, wrote a proposal, and is now writing a manuscript. She didn’t sit back and talk about her project and hope it would happen. In honor of my client’s cookbook contract, I’d like to share my 3 sure-fire ways to NOT write your cookbook:

1. Wait for inspiration

One way to not write your cookbook is to wait for inspiration before you write. This means, if you don’t feel inspired, just go ahead and take a break from writing. Instead, wait for the rush of ideas to come and the words to flow – wait for the magical writing fairy dust!

The problem with this is that those times seldom produce a large quantity of work and they don’t come frequently. Dedicated writers know that they can’t wait for inspiration before they write. They commit to writing whether they “feel” like it or not. Then, once they show up at the computer or notebook, inspiration pokes its head in the door and the writing gets done. In the end, it’s impossible to tell the difference between work that comes easy to an author and those paragraphs which an aspiring author rewrote numerous times. For that reason every aspiring author must make a habit out of showing up to write on a consistent basis, whether they feel inspired or not. Without a habit of writing, or creating content for your book, your project won’t move along.

2. Wait for permission

Another way to not write your cookbook is to wait for permission before you take action on your idea. In fact, be sure to try to get approval from everyone that you think matters – your friends, your spouse, your sisters – before you move forward. If for some reason they don’t like your idea then put your cookbook dream on hold. Ignore the excitement you feel about your idea because it’s not good enough. Others said it’s not good and because they know better, go ahead and stop.

The problem here is that there are really …

Eight Reasons Writers Procrastinate
Eight Reasons Writers Procrastinate
Procrastination means at its most pure form putting off what we need to do and doing something else instead. The “instead” isn’t always less important, or mindless, but sometimes it is. Sometimes I’m an expert at procrastination, especially when I don’t have a deadline. “Instead”, I look at Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, or Twitter, work on my bookkeeping, Google my name, shop online for  shoes, run errands, make “to-do” lists, clean the kitchen, play Two Dots on my iPhone, check blog unsubscribes and newsletter opt-outs, watch YouTube videos, and fritter away my time with everything but writing.
Procrastination creates stress because my writing tasks don’t go away. And, if anything, when I procrastinate the writing project acts like a toddler and pulls on my leg until I pay attention to it.
Many aspiring cookbook authors struggle with procrastination too. For the next few blog posts, I’m going to write about procrastination. Today, I’ll cover common reasons why writers procrastinate. In the next blog post I’ll give some suggestions to stay focused on your writing.
Here are my top eight reasons why writers procrastinate:
1. We can’t do our project justice. We know we need to do more research or that we have the wrong answer. We need to do more background work in order to maintain our standards, but we don’t want to. We just want to write, not fix something or do research. So instead, we don’t do anything.
2. The project isn’t good for us. It may take our career in a direction we don’t want to take. Or maybe, it’s not right because we’re underpaid for the job and we’re working way too hard for the pay. There are even times when there’s no money attached to a cookbook for self-publication or when writing a cookbook for our families. We think that no one will ever know if we stop working since this project isn’t good a good fit or earning money.
3. The project is too easy. If it’s too easy, we become bored and when we are bored, we aren’t interested in working. It’s hard to sit down and work on an easy, boring project. Just ask any intelligent 6th grader. They’ll tell you if it’s too easy, the next step is boredom. Then comes finding other things to do that seem more exciting.
4. We are paralyzed by the idea that we and our book concept isn’t good enough. At the deepest level, we fear being exposed for the fraud we actually are. We ask ourselves, “Will anyone know that I haven’t earned this spot to write this book or article?” As a result, we seek out familiar tasks where we shine (such as writing status updates on Facebook or sending funny Tweets).  Our followers like these posts, plus it’s easier than writing where we risk our reputation.
5. We compare ourselves to writers with “natural talent”.  We have unrealistic expectations about what writing means because all we see from other successful writers is their …
Cookbook Proposals: Writing Your Cookbook’s Summary
Cookbook Proposals: Writing Your Cookbook’s Summary

Writing a cookbook proposal is an important step before writing a cookbook manuscript. One of the first meaty parts of your cookbook proposal is your cookbook summary. This section must hook and engage the agent and/or editor with clearly written information about your cookbook. For today’s blog post I’ll review the two parts of the cookbook summary.

1. A 25-word cookbook summary

Some people in the business call this statement the 25-word cookbook summary. (OK, it can be 30 words, but it needs to be short.) Maybe you’ve heard of an elevator speech or elevator pitch? Your cookbook summary is similar. Your cookbook needs an elevator pitch.

The summary defines your cookbook and its value to your audience. It contains the succinct and clear answer to the question you will inevitably be asked, “What’s your cookbook about?” And, as for the word “elevator”, imagine that this summary must be verbalized in the time you would have in an elevator with the agent or editor who wants to know what your cookbook is about.

This short summary and its tiny collection of words serves to help pitch your book to agents and/or publishers. It could form the core of press releases and might even serve as a dust-jacket blurb or sound-bite for your book. It will make your cookbook stand apart from all the others, but only if it’s done well. It can be customized ever so slightly when necessary, depending on who’s going to read it.

The 25-word Cookbook Summary needs to convey:

What the book is about (including genre and/or target reader demographic)?

Who will relate to your book, buy it, and want to read it?

Why an agent must represent you and your book and/or publisher must publish the book?

That’s a lot packed into 25 words, but this is an important task. It doesn’t matter if it’s perfect the first time you write it. Chances are it will become more clear and powerful as you work on other parts of this proposal, so refer back to this summary after you write your proposal to tweak and hone the words.

Just to give an example, the 25-word summary for my cookbook is:

A seasonal cooking journey that guides home cooks through a year in a Kentucky kitchen, highlighting the best of the Bluegrass with local dishes for all to enjoy.

2. A 250- to 300-word cookbook concept introduction

This gives the agent and/or publisher a more in-depth overview of why you want to write the book and why it should be published. In this section you describe the benefits of your cookbook and its appeal to your audience. This overview communicates in a clear and compelling way what the cookbook is about and who the market is for your book. Be sure to shed light on important things right up front. For example, if a large segment of your target audience has been demanding this book, this is where you tell the agent and/or publisher about that. Give …

Cookbook Proposals are Important
Cookbook Proposals are Important

Every non-fiction author needs to know how to write a book proposal. This is the way that non-fiction books are “sold” – the author writes the proposal to educate another person (be it an agent, editor, or financial backer) about the book they intend to write. Aspiring cookbook authors are no different – they need to know how to write a proposal too and for the same reasons – to educate your agent, editor, or financial backer, about your cookbook idea. Even when I wrote my cookbook for a university press, I had to write a proposal to sell my book, myself, and my idea to the review boards who accept or reject book ideas for the press.

Whether you plan to self-publish your cookbook, or shop around for an agent and/or cookbook publisher, a cookbook proposal is a very important step. In this blog post, I’ll summarize the reasons why a cookbook proposal is important, not matter your planned route to publication.

If you are an aspiring cookbook author who plans to self-publish your cookbook a proposal is still an essential and very important step in the process. And, although you might be the only person who “sees” your proposal, the act of writing one will do several things.

* A cookbook proposal will help you identify your audience for your cookbook. Everything you do in your cookbook you do for your audience.
* The proposal will help you write your cookbook concept in detail. You need to be able to describe your concept in a concrete and descriptive way.
* A proposal serves as your plan for the path to get your cookbook written, produced, and then most importantly in the hands of readers. It covers not just your topic, but your plans for the marketing and sales of your book as well.
* Because you pay for all aspects of self-publishing, a cookbook proposal can serve as a business plan for your cookbook in the event you want to seek funding for your publishing venture. You’re a publisher now, and it’s time to look at your book as your business, so the proposal is key.

If, on the other hand, you’re an aspiring cookbook author who plans to seek a traditional publisher, your cookbook proposal is equally important but for different reasons. First and foremost you need to sell an agent/editor on the idea of your cookbook. You need to get them to “buy in” to you and your idea. Therefore, your cookbook proposal will:

* Provide a thorough overview of your unforgettable cookbook concept.
* Introduce you as the perfect author for cookbook concept.
* Define how and why a publisher should take their time, and spend their money, on the publication of your book.
* Provide a snapshot of your writing style and voice.
* Give a taste of your book through a sample of your best recipes.
* Summarize why someone would want to purchase your book.
* Define the audience you bring to …

Let’s Think About Book Marketing
Let’s Think About Book Marketing
After you write a cookbook, your next job is to sell the cookbook. It’s never too soon to start thinking about promotion for your book. With your target audience and cookbook sales goals in mind you can be more focused to write a cookbook that your audience will go out of their way to buy. For the new year take some time to brainstorm answers to these questions:
Who is your target audience?
Are they Male? Female? Young? Retired? Employed? Experienced cook? Newlywed? Teenage cook? College Student?
Who do you want to read and buy your cookbook?
The answer to this might be the same as #1, but if your target audience is a child, you’ll have to get the adults to buy the book for the child. So in this instance the target audience and person buying the book may not be the same.
Why will your target audience read and buy your cookbook?
Do you help them solve a problem?
Or can you help them with a challenge they have in the kitchen?
What is your goal for book sales?
Will you feel successful if you sell 1,000 copies, or do you want to sell 10,000 copies?  Only you can define your yardstick for success.
How will you reach this goal?

If you want to sell 1,000 copies of your cookbook, you need to engage at least 3,000 people and get 1,000 of them to convert to a book sale. This can be done in many creative ways. With the advent of social media and global internet connections it’s easier to get the word out about your book than it used to be, but the end goal is to get people to buy your book.

Writing your cookbook is your first job. Selling it is your second job. It’s never too early to consider how you will sell your book and chances are if you think of these marketing strategies now, your book will be written with your end result in mind.

How is a cookbook coach different from an agent or an acquisitions editor?
How is a cookbook coach different from an agent or an acquisitions editor?

As I mentioned in my last blog post I often felt alone when I was writing my cookbook. Because I like solitude I didn’t mind working alone, but when I had questions, or when fear reared its head, I didn’t have many places to turn for answers or support. My acquisitions editor was great and she would have done anything for me, but she couldn’t always answer my recipe-specific or food-related questions. And, because she was busy with other authors too, she was unable to give me much personal time or attention. In addition, I never retained an agent, so when I needed someone to help me expel the fears that writing created, or when it was time to negotiate my contract, I was on my own.

After my cookbook was published I heard similar stories from aspiring authors about the challenges they faced without an editor and/or an agent. Or, as in my case, even when an acquisitions editor was in the picture it was not uncommon for the aspiring author to feel alone because of the difference between the support they needed and what their editor could provide. I also heard stories from authors who self-published their cookbooks and didn’t have an agent or acquisitions editor to answer their questions. And finally, there were stories from aspiring authors who were at the beginning stages of their writing project and had yet to develop a relationship with either an agent or an editor. They really had nowhere to turn for support, encouragement, and direction.

In the life of book publishing, there are three key players that appear in the pre-publication phase of the book: agents, acquisitions editors, and book or cookbook coaches. Let’s discuss what they do, how they get paid, and advantages of working with each.

Literary agents usually work for a literary agency, but sometimes work in a solo-owned business. Their job is to represent aspiring and established authors to publishers. Agents help authors in many ways. They are in close communication with publishers and have inside knowledge about genres or subjects of interest to a publisher. They may also know when a publisher is searching for an author to write a book on a particular topic and one of their authors just might be asked to write that specific book. Agents are essential in selling an author’s book idea to certain publishers and then the agent helps negotiate the publishing contract. Agents are not paid upfront. Agents are paid around 15% (or $0.15 out of every $1.00) of the author’s advance and royalties on the book. There’s no doubt, agents are a tremendous source of knowledge, support, and advice for authors. I know some authors who would never consider writing a book without an agent, but that said it is possible to write a book and get it published without an agent. This all depends on your goals and on the publishing options you are interested in pursuing.

Acquisitions editors work for traditional publishing houses. They …

Writing can be lonely place
Writing can be lonely place

I know what it’s like to be alone when writing a cookbook. For me it wasn’t the time by myself that I found difficult, it was the not knowing where to turn to get my food questions answered or to receive some encouraging words when fear set in. My editor was busy with other projects and although she responded to my questions she wasn’t a food person. In addition I didn’t have an agent cheering me on from the sidelines. When I wrote my cookbook I spent most of my days typing and testing recipes all by myself, not talking to a single soul until later in the afternoon.

Flash forward to post-cookbook publication: I felt sympathy and compassion for aspiring cookbook authors who were in pre-publication phase of writing their cookbook. Whether they were mulling over a possible cookbook concept or trying to get their cookbook proposal written, I found myself feeling sorry for them. And since I’d been in that lonely place I decided to do something about it. I expanded my work to include cookbook coaching.

Starting in just a few weeks I’m excited to offer my basic cookbook writing program called Cookbook Camp®. In this a 5-part virtual, group-coaching program I teach Cookbook Campers about the process of writing a cookbook. I encourage aspiring cookbook authors to solidify their cookbook concept, and build their platform, but most of all I provide guidance and support from someone who understands food, cooking, and how to get a cookbook written.

So, if you’re an aspiring cookbook author in the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook and you feel isolated and alone in your work I know that Cookbook Camp is for you.  To learn more you have three options:

1. Visit my Cookbook Camp website and read the results of the program for yourself. Enroll by Friday, January 25th to receive the Early Bird Discount of $100.00 off the program price.

2. If you’re not sure a group coaching program like Cookbook Camp is for you make time to  schedule a complimentary cookbook clarity assessment with me. During this 30-minute phone call we evaluate where you are in your cookbook project and pick the cookbook coaching program or package that is best for your needs. Or, if you’re on the right track, I’ll send you on your way and hope that we meet again at a book fest or book fair in the cookbook aisle!

3. Regardless of whether or not you pick one of the two above options be sure to sign-up for my weekly cookbook writing wisdom tips in Fork, Pen, & Spoon. It might just provide the inspiration you need to get your cookbook project dream off the ground. And, when you receive it each week know that I’m thinking about you and hoping you’re not feeling lonely.

 …

Who Listens When You Talk?
Who Listens When You Talk?

Or who listens when I talk for that matter? This is the question most publishers ask when they consider publishing works of non-fiction. Who Listens When This Prospective Author Talks?

This is called your platform. And it’s very important for non-fiction authors, including cookbook authors. Your message to your audience needs to be heard through various mediums: social-media (Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin), blog postings, e-mail marketing, print media, speaking engagements, and cooking classes. I’m sure there are more ways to connect with your audience, but these are the few that come to mind for me.

Building your own unique platform takes time. It takes intentional effort to connect with your audience.

On Tuesday, January 15, 2013 I am offering a complimentary teleclass about cookbook author platforms. Would love to have you join me. Learn more about the upcoming Who Listens When You Talk? teleseminar here.

Want To Write A Cookbook: Wonder Where To Start?
Want To Write A Cookbook: Wonder Where To Start?

If you have the dream of writing a cookbook but wonder where to start, how to find a publisher, whether there’s money to be made, or if you need an agent, then you need to keep reading. As a cookbook editor and cookbook author I have experienced cookbook writing from both sides of the fence. Because of these experiences it’s not unusual for aspiring cookbook authors ask me questions about writing cookbooks. It’s funny, but in answering their questions I soon realized how much I enjoy helping others with their cookbook writing questions. For example, a food blogger who worked with me felt unclear and confused about her cookbook concept. After we reviewed together my Essential Ingredients For Writing A CookbookTM the “light bulb went on.” Her cookbook concept became crystal clear. She was thrilled and confident about moving forward with her cookbook project.

We all know there are several ways to get a cookbook published. But, the problem is that there aren’t many places that an aspiring cookbook author can turn to get their cookbook writing and publishing questions answered. In fact it seems that during the pre-publication stage of writing cookbooks there’s just not much support out there leaving aspiring cookbook authors feeling frustrated, isolated, and confused.
For these reasons, and for a limited time in early 2012, I am offering a new cookbook coaching program. This program contains a combination of group and private coaching calls, and if you so desire, assistance with writing a solid cookbook proposal.

Everyone who signs up for one of the cookbook coaching programs will receive support and lots of checklists and assessments about whipping their cookbook into shape. More importantly, aspiring cookbook authors who participate will feel supported as they are given the direction and confidence they need to move forward with their dream cookbook project.
In the end, participation in this cookbook coaching program will save you time. In this day and age where everything moves so quickly this is key because it’s possible that someone else is out there working on a cookbook with the same concept you want to write about. Now is the time to stop trying to answer all the cookbook writing questions on your own. Now is the time to get some direction and focus in your cookbook writing project.
So, here’s the rub:

I’m currently hard at work on my own writing and consulting business, and because of the nature of the program, and the personal interaction we will have, space is limited. To get a spot you’ll need to act quickly because I don’t know how many times next year I will offer this particular cookbook coaching program. To learn more all you have to do is send me an email at info (at) greenapron (dot) com let me know if you are interested. I will then send you all the details. I sincerely hope you will join me. It’s going to provide the direction you need and boost your confidence so you …

Cookbook Camp Is Underway!
Cookbook Camp Is Underway!

Yesterday we (me and enrolled Cookbook Campers) completed our second session of our 5-part Cookbook Camp. During the session I dove deep into a discussion about cookbook concept development and present six considerations for developing a clear cookbook concept.

Not too long after we finished our session, a Cookbook Camper e-mailed me to say that she had an epiphany about her cookbook concept – “it became crystal-clear,” she remarked.

This is what I love about working with aspiring cookbook authors. Sometimes we think our cookbook concept needs to appeal to “everyone”. But in reality, when a cookbook author visualizes who their intended audience is, and then proceeds to write to that audience, a more clear concept for their book comes into focus.

This is not always easy to do, and it takes some work, but in the end this is what we need to do. This is also something that helps with cookbook publication, no matter the route one chooses for their cookbook. Not to mention, a clear concept goes a long way in marketing and selling the cookbook as well.

Our next 5-part Cookbook Camp will begin in early 2012. Stay tuned for more details.…

3 Ways to Build Your Cookbook Platform
3 Ways to Build Your Cookbook Platform

So here I am, back in September, at a book event. Yes, a public speaking event about seasonal cooking and this was followed by a book signing.  Public speaking events at libraries, extension offices, women’s and senior’s groups, and specialty food markets are part of my platform. Public speaking puts me in front of a group of people and they get to know me better. If they like me, and let’s hope they do, and if they like my message about seasonal foods and cooking, they might even buy my cookbook. This is the goal of an author platform: to connect me with my customers. To get them to know, like, and trust me, so that they buy my books and products from me.

In addition to this goal of connecting with customers, an aspiring cookbook author develops a platform for an additional reason: to attract attention around their message, and to attract attention from publishers and agents. Then they might just want to publish a book you write, all because they know, like, and trust you. They trust that you can help bring in book sales because you’ve built a strong platform.

Here are 3 ways to start building your author platform:

1. Define the target audience for your book and your message. Who is your ideal client or customer for your book? Who are you speaking to when you write? Is it: teens who want to learn to cook? Home-bakers who use gluten-free flours? or perhaps it’s single professional men who love to cook, but want simple, delicious recipes so they can entertain clients at home? Define who you are talking to and who your message is targeted for. Then get out there and talk to them – in person, in print, in digital media, and virtually.

2. Build a strong base or hub such as a blog or website. All of the work you do in your platform drives people back to your base or your hub. This is the center-piece of your book or your business. Everything revolves around here. If you don’t have a blog or website yet, start to develop one. Simple and free blogs are available from WordPress.comand Blogger.com. When you start to blog, remember you are having a conversation with your audience. There is no magic number about how often to blog, what’s more important is to strive to blog consistently.

3. Focus on getting to know your customers through social media such as Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin. Be selective about your social media. I limit my involvement to the three I just mentioned, but there are many more social media opportunities out there, such as Google + and MySpace. Pick the few  you want to use, set up profiles that align with your message and with your website or blog, and start socializing. You don’t need to spend all day with social media to be effective. Your goal is to get to know your ideal customers and to develop …

Upcoming Cookbook Camp

If writing a cookbook is a dream of yours, and if you think all the time about the excitement of writing your very own cookbook then Cookbook Camp is for you.

If the process of writing a cookbook seems overwhelming then I invite you to join  me for my upcoming 5-session Cookbook Camp. During Cookbook Camp we will capture your spirit of excitement while we explore your dream of writing a cookbook, with a savvy group of like-minded, aspiring cookbook authors.

Read more about Cookbook Camp here.

Do You Want To Write A Cookbook?

Have you ever heard that still, small voice inside whisper, “You ought to write a cookbook”?

If you pay attention to that voice you may answer, “Sure, I’d love to write a cookbook, but I don’t have a clue where to begin? Or perhaps you say,

  • I don’t know how to write a cookbook.
  • I’m not an English major or a culinary expert.
  • I don’t know how to combine my expertise with the craft of cooking.
  • I don’t know how to navigate the publishing industry.
  • It all seems so daunting.
  • I don’t know how to sell a cookbook.
  • I’m not a Food Network star.
  • ……and all sorts of other doubts you may have.

If your response resonates with these I encourage you to join my free teleclass for aspiring cookbook writers:

You Can Write A Cookbook:

Essential Ingredients for Success

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

12:00 EST/11:00 CST

With this unique teleclass you have the opportunity to:

  • learn essentials of writing a cookbook.
  • explore how your passion for writing a cookbook stacks up against the reality of writing a cookbook.
  • make the connection between your expertise and cookbooks.
  • begin to remove the barriers you might have for writing your own cookbook.
  • learn the next step in writing your own cookbook.

To register for this free, one-of-a-kind teleclass click here:

I sincerely hope to see you on Tuesday, September 20th as we pay attention to the small voice moving aspiring cookbook authors toward a cookbook of his or her very own.

“Cook-books have always intrigued and seduced me. When I was still a dilettante in the kitchen they held my attention, even the dull ones, from cover to cover, the way crime and murder stories did.”
‘The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book’ (1954)…

Do You Want To Write A Cookbook?
Do You Want To Write A Cookbook?

Have you ever heard that still, small voice inside whisper, “You ought to write a cookbook”? 

If you pay attention to that voice you may answer, “Sure, I’d love to write a cookbook, but I don’t have a clue where to begin?

Or perhaps you say,

  • I don’t know how to write a cookbook.
  • I’m not an English major or a culinary expert.
  • I don’t know how to combine my expertise with the craft of cooking.
  • I don’t know how to navigate the publishing industry.
  • It all seems so daunting.
  • I don’t know how to sell a cookbook.
  • I’m not a Food Network star.
  • ……and all sorts of other doubts you may have.

If your response resonates with these I encourage you to join my free teleclass for aspiring cookbook writers:

You Can Write Your Own Cookbook:

Essential Ingredients for Success

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 

12:00 EST/11:00 CST 

With this unique teleclass you have the opportunity to:

  • learn essentials of writing a cookbook.
  • explore how your passion for writing a cookbook stacks up against the reality of writing a cookbook.
  • make the connection between your expertise and cookbooks.
  • begin to remove the barriers you might have for writing your own cookbook.
  • learn the next step in writing your own cookbook.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

I sincerely hope to see you on March 23, 2011 as we pay attention to the small voice moving aspiring cookbook authors toward a cookbook of his or her very own.

“Cook-books have always intrigued and seduced me. When I was still a dilettante in the kitchen they held my attention, even the dull ones, from cover to cover, the way crime and murder stories did.”
The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book’ (1954)…