Episode 3| Interview with cookbook reader and collector Kim Cowherd
Episode 3| Interview with cookbook reader and collector Kim Cowherd

In this episode of the podcast, Maggie interviews cookbook reader and collector Kim Cowherd. Kim is a fellow Kentuckian and retired horticulturist. She has a love of gardening and farmers’ markets due to her horticulture background. Kim has a fondness for stories found in cookbooks with a particular interest in church and community cookbooks.

Listen to Episode 003 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

Here’s How To Subscribe

I’d love for you to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss any new episodes

How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal.

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?
Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks?
Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?
Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect outside of the Cookbook Love Podcast Facebook Group.

 

 

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Episode 2| Interview with Jenny Hartin of Cookbook Junkies Facebook Group and Eat Your Books
Episode 2| Interview with Jenny Hartin of Cookbook Junkies Facebook Group and Eat Your Books

In this episode, Maggie interviews Jenny Hartin. Jenny is the owner and administrator of  Cookbook Junkies Facebook Group and cookbookjunkies.com as well as the Director of Publicity for Eat Your Books. Jenny shares her introduction into the cookbook space as a cook and cookbook collector, why she started Cookbook Junkies and her role as Director of Publicity for Eat Your Books.

Listen to Episode 002 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

Here’s How To Subscribe

I’d love for you to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss any new episodes. Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus, iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review right here.

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?
Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks?
Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?
Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect outside of the Cookbook Love Podcast Facebook Group.

 

 

 …

Episode 1| Interview with Kelsey Banfield of Little Snack Newsletter
Episode 1| Interview with Kelsey Banfield of Little Snack Newsletter

In this episode to the podcast, Maggie interview Kelsey Banfield of The Little Snack Newsletter. Kelsey shares about her love of organizing her cookbooks by color, what she learned from her mom about cookbooks, and more about her newsletter The Snack Cookbook Club.

Listen to Episode 001 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

Here’s How To Subscribe

I’d love for you to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss any new episodes. Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus, iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review right here.

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?
Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks?
Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?
Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect outside of the Cookbook Love Podcast Facebook Group.

 

 

 …

Episode 0 | Introduction and Welcome to Cookbook Love Podcast
Episode 0 | Introduction and Welcome to Cookbook Love Podcast

In this welcome and introductory episode to the podcast, host Maggie Green shares her vision, mission, and goals for the show. In addition learn how to connect with Maggie, with the larger Cookbook Love Podcast Community, and how to access show notes for each episode.

Listen to Episode 000 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

Here’s How To Subscribe & Leave A Review (pretty-please):

Want to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss a thing? Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review right here.

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept? Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks? Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show? Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect.

You can also join my free Facebook Group to connect with more cookbook readers, buyers, writers, collectors, and clubs.

 

 

 …

Fall Cookbook Roundup
Fall Cookbook Roundup

Fall is a favorite time of year for cookbook publication, so it’s time for my annual fall cookbook roundup referencing lists from foodies websites, Publishers Weekly, and newspapers. The lists include authors who have written more than one book, I like to remember that for many of the authors this their first book. And every book starts with an idea they had about a topic related to food, cooking, or the kitchen.

And be sure to read the last link about a 19-year old who published a print food magazine.

Huffington Post
Huff Post looks foward to the end of summer with their top 10 fall cookbooks, some from food bloggers, and some from chefs who’ve written mutiple cookbooks. All give us a chance this fall to bake, cook, and slow-cook.

Epicurious
Epicurious takes a look at cookbooks as “the pendulum has swung back to home cooking, and publishers have heard the call.” Chefs and restaurants are no longer front and center of the list that Epicurious has chosen.

Eater
Eater take a look at the Biggest Restaurant Cookbooks of Fall 2017.

Publishers Weekly
PW describes their list as “eclectic” as the books address topics from work hunger to feeding the resistance.

Tasting Table
TT claims that the 37 books they’ve selected will change the way you cook.

LA Times
An “impressive” list with first books about Native American cuisine, drinking food of Thailand, and making bread.

COOKBOOK WRITING
Here’s what I call an amazing story about a 19-year old college student who wanted to write a print publication. So, she went “nerd deep” on a topic and published a magazine. Don’t ever let anyone stop you from your cookbook or print-publication dreams.

Cookbook author and culinary dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors on writing cookbooks and cookbook proposals and building their author platform. Download her checklist “Am I Ready to Write A Cookbook?”

 

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Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 3
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 3

 

Cookbook Writing

Many readers of my weekly newsletter, Fork, Pen, & Spoon, ask what are the specific steps to write a cookbook? In response to their question, I’ve written blog posts that include worksheets to guide you on the steps to start your cookbook project. Here is a summary of the topics covered so far:

· WHO is you cookbook audience
· WHY are you writing a cookbook
· WHAT is your cookbook concept
· HOW to you want to publish your cookbook

Take some time to link to the blog posts, download the worksheets, and identify your who, why, what, and how before we move to step #4.

Food Photography

Dark and moody describes the style of many images used in cookbooks, on food blogs, and in Instagram posts. Want to photograph dark and moody?

Writing

Whether you’re writing a blog post, newsletter, poem, or book, it takes courage to share what you write with others because they decide if they like what you write or not. Many fear this judgement and never write the blog posts, newsletter, poems, or books their audience needs to read. If you struggle with writing because you fear vulnerability, you may enjoy this article from Purpose Fairy that takes a look at courage and vulnerability.

Author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. If you want to write a cookbook, and wonder if you’re ready, download her 11-point checklist Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?

Steps to Write a Cookbook: Routes to Publication
Steps to Write a Cookbook: Routes to Publication

In part #1 of this blog series we focused on WHY you want to write a cookbook as well as your WHO – your target audience.

In part #2, we discussed WHAT – your cookbook concept or main topic. An ideal cookbook concept joins your audience’s needs and desires with your skills, expertise, and knowledge. If you can match what you know, and feel excited to write about, with the needs, desires, or problems of your audience, then you’re well on your way to identifying a cookbook concept. The next step is to ask yourself:

In this part #3 of this ongoing series Steps to Write A Cookbook we will identify your HOW.

HOW do you want to have your cookbook published? Here are some common answers:

  • Organize recipes with an app or recipe software and print at home or using a quick-print shop
  • Operate as an independent publisher and self-publish an ebook or print-on-demand book
  • Pay a publishing company to help publish
  • Secure a publisher without an agent
  • Retain an agent to help find a traditional publisher

These examples are all ways to get a cookbook published. The method of publication you select may be different than another cookbook author. Rather than comparison with what others are doing, I recommend you focus your energy on your reasons why you want to write a cookbook and then choose the route to publication that best matches your goals.

NOTE: If you plan to sell cookbooks to the general public it’s important to build an author platform. Your audience needs to get to hear you, read your work, and get to know you. Once they know you, they are in a better position to buy your book when it’s published. Also, publishers choose to publish writers who are in touch with their target audience through their platform. Read more about platforms here.

Routes to Cookbook Publication

Software or online recipe tools
If you identified your family or a civic group as your WHO and perhaps the goal to raise money or to share recipes with your college-age children as your WHY, your cookbook concept is pretty straight-forward. Your book will contain a set of recipes and maybe some stories, genealogy, history, or photos.  For this type of cookbook, there are online tools and other software to compile your recipes. Costs for each service varies, but because the software streamlines the process it may be worth the price. Outside of online tools, word processing software, such as Microsoft Word or Google Docs, works well to create your book’s interior pages. For a more upscale design consider software such as Adobe Design.

If you want to use an online tool or software to compile recipes for family, your next step is to choose the software or online tool that best suits your needs. Refer to this summary of 5 Tools and Software for Writing a Family or Fundraiser Cookbook.

Self (or independent) publishing
As an independent publisher, you form a publishing company and …

Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 1
Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 1

 

1. Achieving a goal such as writing a cookbook isn’t always about talent, physical looks, TV shows, or hundreds of thousands of social media followers. More than these what can help someone achieve a big goal are the habits they practice on a daily basis. Here’s an article I enjoyed about 8 Habits More Important to Success Than Raw Talent.

2. When writing a cookbook we need to define the audience for our book and recipes. Is the audience kids, retirees, or teens? Maybe it’s young moms, single parents, or the DIY crowd. This recent Bon Appetit article brings to light the Millennial generation (born early 1980’s to early 2000’s) and their focus on food. Maybe they are the audience for your cookbook?

3. Is food writing becoming a “men’s club”? Kathleen Purvis explores this topic in her recent article and study of the pre-dominance of male voices in 21st century Southern food writing.

4. Santa Monica’s Huckleberry Bakery owner Zoe Nathan wrote a cookbook that was published in 2014. I love this article about her experience writing a cookbook.  When she wrote her cookbook she enlisted the help of recipe testers mainly because she had to scale the recipes to home-size quantities. Her honesty about “winging it” while writing a cookbook provides a lesson in willingness to just do the work even if you don’t always know exactly what you’re doing. I also like her discussion about life balance while writing her cookbook, raising a family, and operating the bakery. The truth is that more often than not cookbook authors lead busy lives in a kitchen and find time to write their books in spite of other things going on in their lives.

5. Cookbook publisher Phaidon plans to release three vegetarian cookbooks this spring. This interview with Emilia Terragni at Phaidon reveals why they are publishing vegetarian cookbooks.

6. And for fun, here’s the Epicurious’ Spring Cookbook roundup for 2016.

Below are a few links to popular posts on this blog about writing cookbooks that you many have missed:

5 Myths about Writing a Cookbook

4 Ways to Find a Traditional Cookbook Publisher

5 Tools and Software for Writing a Family or Fundraiser Cookbook

Q&A: How Do I Write a Cookbook Proposal that Attracts Agents and Publishers?

Is My Cookbook Concept Good Enough?

10 Reasons to Hire a Cookbook Coach

Author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. If you want to write a cookbook, and wonder if you’re ready, download her 11-point checklist Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook? 

Webinar: 5 Mistakes of Aspiring Cookbook Authors
Webinar: 5 Mistakes of Aspiring Cookbook Authors

If you know me, you probably know that I believe a cookbook is the ultimate way to reach an audience you want to teach about food or cooking. In a kitchen, with tangible items like knives, cutting boards, and ingredients, a cookbook fits. And your audience, who’s hungry to learn about what you teach, or hungry for your nutrition message, is the perfect buyer for your your cookbook. There are even people who collect cookbooks, and don’t even cook, that buy cookbooks to read or as gifts.

I’ll never say that writing a cookbook is easy, because it’s not. But, it is very rewarding and an endeavor many aspire to undertake. The problem is there are many moving parts to a cookbook project. Many aspiring cookbook authors don’t know where to start, what to do first, and they worry about countless other things related to writing recipes, self-motivation, and “pulling it all together”.

If you want a to write a cookbook, I’m here to cheer you on. My desire is to teach you what I have learned as a cookbook author, editor, and contributor. In addition, I hope to save you time, money, and effort. There are mistakes to be made when you write a cookbook, but I’d prefer you avoid them, and get started on the right path.

To share these mistakes I plan to offer a free webinar. The webinar will be of great value to anyone who wants to write a cookbook. In the webinar I’ll discuss the 5 Mistakes of Aspiring Cookbook Authors as well as tips on how to avoid them. I hope to see you there. Click here or below on the gray box to enroll. And remember it’s free and offered at two convenient times.

Enroll in the 5 Mistakes of Aspiring Cookbook Authors free webinar

 

 

 

Cookbook author, editor, and culinary dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. If you want to write a cookbook and wonder if you’re ready, download her 11-point checklist Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook? 

5 Links About Cookbooks and Food Writing
5 Links About Cookbooks and Food Writing

I enjoy reading articles and blog posts that lead me to new information about topics I’m interested in. Today, I’d like to share 5 links to interesting books, tools, and websites for writing, cookbooks, and food photography.

1. Millions of Cookbooks Sold About Slow Cookers

Originally published in 2000, Phyllis Good’s Fix-It and Forget-It series (based on slow-cooker recipes) has sold over 11 million copies.

Recently, due to chapter 7 bankruptcy, the series was sold to Skyhorse Publishing who plans to relaunch the series with a new title Fix-It and Forget-It Slow Cooker Magic. In addition to new titles, Skyhorse is working to build social media presence, as well as adjust the book’s trim size, and add new concepts for diabetic and low-fat recipes.

Phyllis Good, who still functions as the author says, “I am absolutely devoted to helping people cook at home where they’re in control of what they’re consuming, and I’m always thinking about whether a recipe I just made could be made in a slow cooker. I also keep on experimenting with how to make a slow cooker do its best work. People want and need convenience, but they also want tasty food. That’s the spot where I focus my energies!”

Read more about the Fix-it and Forget-It Lives Again.

2. Prolific Cookbook Writers

I enjoy reading About.com’s Cookbook and Food Writing newsletter. Recently, Allen Salking, About.com’s Cookbook and Food Writing Expert, wrote an article about Dorie Greenspan and Julia Child’s Foolproof Recipe Writing. They include a discussion about writing conversational recipes and being a prolific cookbook writer. Enjoy this interview, here.

3. Food Writing Sins

In another About.com article, Gillian Speiser discusses with Gabrielle Langholtz the 10 Sins Newbie Food Writers Commit. This article discusses catching the attention of an editor and how to avoid the pitfalls of new food writer.

4. IACP Award Winners

On March 29, 2015 at their annual conference in Washington, D.C., IACP (International Association of Culinary Professionals) presented their annual awards for cookbooks, magazines, food writing, and photography both in print and in the digital space. Here’s the complete list of 2015 winners. If you want to write a cookbook pay attention to the publishers, the editors, and the concepts. The Judges Choice award was a self-published cookbook, Good and Cheap: Eat Well on $4/day by Leanne Brown.

5. Food Photography for Bloggers

If you want to tweak your food photography, and “be proud of your food photos”, you might be interested in this eBook Tasty Food Photography by Lindsay who writes and photographs the Pinch of Yum food blog

Cookbook author and culinary dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors in the process of writing cookbooks, cookbook proposals, and building their author platform. Download her checklist “Am I Ready to Write A Cookbook?”. 

Cookbooks for The Holiday Season
Cookbooks for The Holiday Season

Cookbooks are a favorite gift this time of year to give to cooks, foodies, and parents who want to feed healthy meals to their kids. With this in mind there’s no shortage of list of favorite cookbooks. I’ve linked to several “favorite cookbook” lists below.

Lynn Neary of National Public Radio recently broadcast a story about the survival of independent bookstores. This holiday season, she said, “Cookbooks are the new black.” Print cookbooks continue to have strong sales. Remember, whether you are buying a cookbook for yourself or a friend, or whether you want to write your own cookbook, it seems that print cookbooks are still alive and well.

Chicago Tribune: Butcher-friendly kitchens
http://trib.in/UCw9cE

Six cookbooks for the chefs on your gift list
http://bit.ly/U9nv4X

Cookbooks will make great holiday presents
http://bit.ly/Z15a0Y

Best cookbooks of 2012: Amazon
http://bit.ly/12lZkoN

“Cookbooks are the new black”
http://bit.ly/UUCzX5

The Crème de la Crème of Cookbooks
http://on.wsj.com/VD0hTM

24 Cookbook Gifts for the 12 Kinds of Cooks in Your Life
http://bit.ly/TIsEmk

10 cookbooks worthy of Christmas gifts to your favorite foodies
http://bit.ly/12lZrkf

Cookbooks for holiday giving
http://bit.ly/ZhLJjw

If you dream of writing your own cookbook, schedule a Cookbook Clarity Assessment with Maggie today. This 30-minute phone call and assessment can help you get your cookbook on the road to publication.

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Cookbook Author Interview: Amelia Saltsman - Cookbooks Need Universal Message
Cookbook Author Interview: Amelia Saltsman - Cookbooks Need Universal Message

 

Earlier this year I participated in a conference call sponsored by IACP. The guest speaker was Michael Ruhlman and his presentation was about his cookbooks and how he has translated the information in his cookbooks to the world of apps and digital media.

During the Q & A portion of the call I heard Amelia Saltsman ask several astute questions of Michael. Michael knew Amelia and gave the shout out that Amelia had self-published her cookbook.Since I’m always on the lookout for cookbook authors to interview for this column, I e-mailed Amelia to ask if she’d be willing to be interviewed. She graciously accepted we recently spent some time on the phone to conduct this interview.

Nothing brings me a whole lot more joy than speaking with other cookbook authors. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again, writing a cookbook is a labor of love. But with some passion around a topic of the kitchen, the dream of writing a cookbook can become a reality.

Thanks, Amelia, for taking time to be interviewed for this series. You’re a gem and terrific resource for anyone who wants to self-publish a cookbook. When I look at your cookbook it shines.

1. Is this your first cookbook?

Yes, this was my first solo cookbook. I have contributed to other cookbooks, worked as a food stylist, media escort for cookbook authors, recipe developer, and written for magazines and newspapers, and had a strong regional platform with the LA Times food section and on radio, but didn’t have a cookbook of my own. I felt strongly that if I was going to write a cookbook it needed to enter the market with a strong presence and splash in order to compete against other cookbook authors who were writing amazing books. Some of these authors I had worked with and others that I just knew were out there writing terrific cookbooks.

2. Did you have a food blog prior to writing your cookbook?

No I didn’t have a food blog, blogs were not as much of a presence when I wrote my book. That said, a lot has changed since I wrote my book related to food blogs. There are very many food blogs and very many good food blogs, but as a cookbook editor once said, “…with so many food blogs it’s hard to cut through the “noise”. That said a food blog can be a platform for a cookbook author or food writer.

In a more tangible way a book is also a big part of a writer’s platform. This real thing, the book, becomes a touchstone for their work and can lead a cookbook author from a regional platform to a more national platform. For me my universal message about seasonal ingredient shopping and cooking, and the story of the market, became very real through my book and this message speaks to cooks all across the country.

3. What compelled you to write a cookbook?

First, I have a …

Cookbook Author Interview: Jeanne Sauvage - A terrific way to get a sense of the process is to write a cookbook proposal.
Cookbook Author Interview: Jeanne Sauvage - A terrific way to get a sense of the process is to write a cookbook proposal.

Over the past nine months I (Maggie) have come to grips with a new reality – cookbooks are my passion. Cookbooks, more than a printed recipe off the internet, are a window into the heart and soul of the author. You learn a lot about a person by reading their cookbook – the way they write, cook, eat, and more.

For almost 30 years I have loved to read cookbooks and have amassed quite a collection. For the past 10 years I’ve worked closely with cookbook authors in several capacities, and now as if in a dream sequence, I have written my first cookbook The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook.

As I moved through the process of writing my  cookbook, I kept thinking about how lucky I was to have this opportunity. I then started thinking about all the  individuals who would love to be where I am, writing a cookbook of their own, but in all honesty  don’t have a clue where to begin. For that reason I am happy to launch a new interview series with cookbook people – authors, editors, agents, designers, production specialists, readers, etc. My goal is to support aspiring cookbook writers in their goal – writing a cookbook.

I’m so excited because my interview today is with Jeanne Sauvage, or as I know her @fourchickens (Twitter handle). Jeanne is newly under contract with Chronicle Books for an upcoming cookbook –Gluten-Free Holiday Baking. Jeanne is under a tight deadline so I’m grateful for her time to do this interview. In it she  shares her opinions about writing cookbooks, food blogs, and some timely advice for aspiring cookbook authors.

You can follow Jeanne on Twitter @fourchickens or visit her lovely blog www.artofglutenfreebaking.com. If you check her recent blog post  you’ll see her call for recipe testers. Maybe you might be a great recipe tester for her book?

Thanks, Jeanne. You are a treasure in the world of cookbooks, recipes, and food. I can’t wait to see your upcoming book.

Do you have any experience writing other books, or is this your first?

This is my first cookbook, but I do have a Ph.D., which required me to write a 500 pp dissertation, so I do have experience writing a book.

Can you tell me how you were offered a contract for your cookbook and the working title? Was your blog a part in a contract?

I was contacted by an editor at Chronicle to write a gluten-free holiday baking cookbook. The editor said that she had been following my blog for a few years and was pleased with what I had done with it. I had no idea she was following my blog. What was helpful here, I think, is that I had been approached by a regional publisher last spring. At my meeting with them, they told me that they wouldn’t publish me until I had strengthened my “platform”–i.e., my blog, Facebook, and Twitter presence, teaching classes, doing demos, etc. Thus, I had been working …

Do You Want To Write A Cookbook?
Do You Want To Write A Cookbook?

Have you ever heard that still, small voice inside whisper, “You ought to write a cookbook”? 

If you pay attention to that voice you may answer, “Sure, I’d love to write a cookbook, but I don’t have a clue where to begin?

Or perhaps you say,

  • I don’t know how to write a cookbook.
  • I’m not an English major or a culinary expert.
  • I don’t know how to combine my expertise with the craft of cooking.
  • I don’t know how to navigate the publishing industry.
  • It all seems so daunting.
  • I don’t know how to sell a cookbook.
  • I’m not a Food Network star.
  • ……and all sorts of other doubts you may have.

If your response resonates with these I encourage you to join my free teleclass for aspiring cookbook writers:

You Can Write Your Own Cookbook:

Essential Ingredients for Success

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 

12:00 EST/11:00 CST 

With this unique teleclass you have the opportunity to:

  • learn essentials of writing a cookbook.
  • explore how your passion for writing a cookbook stacks up against the reality of writing a cookbook.
  • make the connection between your expertise and cookbooks.
  • begin to remove the barriers you might have for writing your own cookbook.
  • learn the next step in writing your own cookbook.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

I sincerely hope to see you on March 23, 2011 as we pay attention to the small voice moving aspiring cookbook authors toward a cookbook of his or her very own.

“Cook-books have always intrigued and seduced me. When I was still a dilettante in the kitchen they held my attention, even the dull ones, from cover to cover, the way crime and murder stories did.”
The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book’ (1954)…