Episode 43 l 2019 Food Trends and Cookbooks
Episode 43 l 2019 Food Trends and Cookbooks

Welcome back to another episode of the Cookbook Love Podcast, today I am excited to talk to you about 2019 Food Trends and Cookbooks. I was recently involved in a research project to take a look at Health and Culinary Trends for a trends report. I have always enjoyed looking at food trends, and in particular how foods and trends in cooking or food make it into the mainstream. This happened with cilantro, from a relatively unknown and unused herb to an herb that millions of people now eat every day at Chipotle in their Lime Cilantro Rice. Food trends also make it into cookbooks more often than not, in particular, if the food trend is one that is embraced in kitchens and cooking. On this episode of the podcast, I select a few trends and take a look at cookbooks that reflect these trends as well as review the food trends below. 

2019 Health and Culinary Food Trends

  1. Wild weeds and green such as sorrel, dandelions, chickweed, mallow, amaranth as a replacement for kale.
  2. Citrus alternatives such as citron, kumquats, yuzu, shaddocks, and pomelos that provide sourness that’s popular as well as unique flavors.
  3. Seed butter to augment nut butter such as tahini, sunflower seed butter, roasted watermelon seed butter, pumpkin seed butter offering alternatives for allergies to tree nuts and peanuts.
  4. Ugly and misshapen food acceptance and use to reduce food with innovative ways to use all parts of food from nose to tail and stem to root.
  5. Digestive health and a newfound appreciation for the microbiome—trillions of bacteria and other microbes that live in our intestinal tract—more products (think fiber, prebiotics, and probiotics) are geared toward improving gut health
  6. Fermented drinks and food such as kefir, kimchi, kombucha, tempeh, miso.
  7. Adaptogens roots and herbs are a select group of herbs (and some mushrooms) that support the body’s natural ability to deal with stress. They are called adaptogens because of their unique ability to “adapt” their function according to the specific needs of the body. Examples include maca, ginseng, Rhodiola Rosea, reishi, ashwagandha holy basil, Schizandra.
  8. #veganuary and McVegan burgers tested at the Chicago McDonalds headquarters.
  9. Growth of the vegan, vegetarian, and eco-friendly movements, many are turning away from traditional protein sources like meat. Faux meats and plant-based meat options are available everywhere, from local co-ops to Target and Walmart.
  10. Meat-alternatives including plants, insects, lentils, soy, dairy-free protein alternatives going mainstream. Innovations highlighting nuts, extruded seeds, beans, water lentils and algae in snack bars, chips, meat-free burgers or sausages, and dairy-free yogurts and cheeses and cell-based meat and protein extracted from animals’ cells without killing the animal at all.
  11. Hemp hearts, seeds, and oils are in everything from waffle mix to dried pasta, and new interest in the potential benefits stemming from other parts of the hemp plant.
  12. Foods infused with CBD oil. CBD, also known as cannabidiol, has a multitude of uses including an ingredient in a variety of edibles defined as food or beverage products that
Episode 42 l The Difference Between Cookbook Writing & Cookbook Publishing
Episode 42 l The Difference Between Cookbook Writing & Cookbook Publishing

Welcome back to another episode of the Cookbook Love Podcast. In this episode of the podcast, I discuss the difference between cookbook writing and cookbook publishing. Cookbook writing is a solitary act and involves a person writing a book around a single topic. They think of an idea, they decide who they can help or who their ideal reader is, and they create content for the book. Then they work on getting the book published. Publishing is the business of preparing books for sale. The business model for publishing is book sales. The publishers pay authors advances/royalties and count on writers and authors to provide content for their books. The 3 main functions of publishing houses are the editing of the manuscript, preparation of the manuscript for design, book design, book production, and the marketing and sales of a book.

Listen to Episode 42 below:

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 …

Episode 41 l How To Start a Cookbook Club
Episode 41 l How To Start a Cookbook Club

Welcome back to another episode of the Cookbook Love Podcast. This episode was inspired by a letter that I received from a listener about how to start a cookbook club in her neighborhood. In this episode, I read the communication from the listener, and provide tips on starting your own cookbook club.

Listen to Episode 41 below:

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And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review for the podcast here. 

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 …

Episode 40 l My Top 10 Cookbooks for the 1000 Cookbooks Project
Episode 40 l My Top 10 Cookbooks for the 1000 Cookbooks Project

Welcome back to another episode of the Cookbook Love Podcast. After last week’s podcast with Monica Llamas, I was invited to submit my top 10 cookbooks for the 1000 Cookbooks Project. The 1000 Cookbook project is building a comprehensive and curated collection of the very best food and recipe content. Their goal with the project is “to help people discover books and recipes which will help them build their knowledge, expand their repertoire, and delight their family and friends”.  In this episode, I talk about my 10 favorite books in my collection, and I added one book for honorable mention. All of the books are listed below, and also included is a link to my list on the 1000 Cookbooks website.

Listen to Episode 40 below:

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And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review for the podcast here. 

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 …

Episode 39 l Interview with ckbk Community Manager Monique Llamas
Episode 39 l Interview with ckbk Community Manager Monique Llamas

Welcome back to another episode of the Cookbook Love Podcast. Today I’m excited to welcome back Monique Llamas. Since we spoke with Monique on Episode 4, Monique has a new role as the Community Manager for ckbk. As the Community Manager, Monique manages ckbk’s presence on social media channels Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Monique also tells us more about Ckbk. Ckbk offers free and premium memberships for search and discovery for over 300 cookbook titles, including classic, contemporary, out-of-print, and reference cookbooks. In today’s episode, Monique and I talk about her founding the ckbk cookbook club, as well as her interest in other online cookbooks clubs. Cookbook clubs offer opportunities for cookbook lovers to connect online in conjunction with content from a specific cookbook, usually, a cookbook selected each month, or related to one specific recipe choice out of a cookbook. Monique also discusses her tips on starting a cookbook club from announcing the club, spreading the word, setting an intention for the goal of the club, setting up a schedule, and being consistent in the club’s rules and postings. Most important is to have fun and use the clubs as a positive way to connect with cookbook-, food-, and recipe-lovers online. I hope you enjoy this episode with Monique!

Listen to Episode 39 below:

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Episode 38 l Why Write Cookbooks (And Not a Food Blog)
Episode 38 l Why Write Cookbooks (And Not a Food Blog)

Welcome back to another episode of the Cookbook Love Podcast. I’m excited to be sharing this new episode with you. I record a podcast episode every week and have done so since September. I want to first say that I’m so excited I jumped into this space to celebrate cookbook readers, buyers, collectors, writers, and clubs. Not many other podcasts are celebrating you.

My journey with cookbooks started with cookbook reading and has taken me on a path through cookbook editing and now writing 4 cookbooks of my own. I love writing cookbooks and there are several advantages I see to writing a cookbook over a food blog. I say this knowing there are many successful, professional food bloggers, but cookbooks suit me well (and they may suit you well too). For today’s episode, I share why I choose to write cookbooks over a food blog. Here is the list of whys – and in the episode I explain each one in more details.

  • Food photography is not my responsibility
  • Cookbook manuscript writing is a finite project
  • Cookbooks are portable and can be carried to events
  • Participation in gifts and giveaways
  • Status of working with a traditional publisher
  • Prove to self could do it
  • Attend Kentucky Book Fair (now called Kentucky Book Festival)
  • Learn and help others in their kitchens
  • Share simple, delicious food

Listen to Episode 38 below:

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And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review for the podcast here. 

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Episode 37 l Recipe and Cookbook Abundance
Episode 37 l Recipe and Cookbook Abundance

Welcome back to another episode of the Cookbook Love Podcast. Today’s episode was inspired by a Mother’s Day meal we shared with our son and his girlfriend. They both work at high-end restaurants in Cincinnati. It’s not uncommon that when we get together we talk about the restaurant and their favorite dishes on the menu. The conversation recently turned to a cold sliced pork dish with tuna sauce. They absolutely adored the dish and the new-to-them pairing of pork and tuna. As a cookbook collector may do after a conversation like that, I turned to my cookbook collection to find the recipe. I found a recipe in Marcella Hazen’s Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking, for Vitello Tonnato – Cold Sliced Veal with Tuna Sauce. As I searched for this recipe in four of my Italian cookbooks, I was struck by the abundance of recipes and cookbooks we have at our fingertips.

On the internet and in our cookbook collections we can find almost anything. Despite this abundance, we feel like we’re still missing the secret, out of alignment with what we have, like we’re missing out, overwhelmed, and in general, everything being hard from planning, prepping, shopping, cooking, and doing the dishes. On the podcast today, I explore this: why do we feel negative when we have so much recipe, how-to, and cookbook abundance? I think it’s because of how we’re thinking about it, and that in order to feel better, we don’t need more information and cookbooks, we need to change the way we think about what we have. Tune in to hear my 6 tips to work with Recipe and Cookbook Abundance to learn something new and create new results in your kitchen.

Listen to Episode 37 below:

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How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review for the podcast here. 

Let’s

Episode 36 l Interview with Cookbook Collectors, Champion Pie Bakers, and Authors Chris Taylor and Paul Arguin
Episode 36 l Interview with Cookbook Collectors, Champion Pie Bakers, and Authors Chris Taylor and Paul Arguin

Welcome back to another episode of the Cookbook Love Podcast. Today’s episode was a lot of fun as I interview Chris Taylor and Paul Arguin. Chris and Paul are cookbook collectors. They are scientists by trade, and one day, about 10 years ago they decided to enter an amateur pie competition. Chris’ Lemon Strawberry Pie won 1st place, and from there, they have been on a journey of pie, culminating in a 2017 Best of Show award at the National Pie Championship. As a result of their win their, and an article in the NYT, they were approached about writing a cookbook of their own. In this interview we talk about their journey through pie competitions, writing their cookbook, and their favorite pie and baking books.

Listen to Episode 36 below:

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How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review for the podcast here. 

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?

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Episode 35 l Celebrate Kentucky Derby with Kentucky Cookbooks
Episode 35 l Celebrate Kentucky Derby with Kentucky Cookbooks

Welcome back to this week’s episode of the Cookbook Love Podcast. Today I am excited to share with you an episode on Kentucky Cookbooks. This episode holds a special place in my heart and life because I was born and raised in Kentucky, and because the Kentucky Derby was always a sporting event that was celebrated by our family. So in today’s episode I share more about Kentucky’s literary tradition, what the Kentucky Derby is, how the Kentucky Derby is celebrated, and a discussion of my favorite Kentucky cookbooks.

Listen to Episode 35 below:

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How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review for the podcast here. 

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?

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Episode 34 l A Look Back at Illustrated Cookbooks
Episode 34 l A Look Back at Illustrated Cookbooks

Welcome back to another episode of the Cookbook Love Podcast. Today’s topic is an offshoot of my episode last week with Literary Agent Maria Ribas. We talked about upcoming trends in cookbooks, and Maria mentioned illustrations. It’s hard to imagine that illustrations will replace photography, but in this episode, I take a look back to illustrated and hand-lettered cookbooks in my collection. My review of these books led me to the discovery that illustrations serve many purposes in cookbooks:  design, instruction of step-by-step processes, identification if ingredients or equipment, or in the case of To The Kings Taste, illustrations that displayed elaborate scenes of medieval dinners and kitchen tasks (such as stomping grapes, or churning butter) created from woodcuts.

Listen to Episode 34 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

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How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review for the podcast here. 

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

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Episode 33 l Interview with Cookbook Collector and Literary Agent Maria Ribas
Episode 33 l Interview with Cookbook Collector and Literary Agent Maria Ribas

Welcome back to another episode of the Cookbook Love Podcast, today I am excited to share an interview with Maria Ribas. Maria is a true cookbook lover. She not only collects cookbooks, and uses cookbooks at home when she cooks, but she also works as a literary agent at Stonesong Literary Agency. At Stonesong, Maria represents authors to publishers, including her favorite genre, cookbook authors. Today on the podcast we discuss the process of acquiring cookbook titles: first, where publishers scout for authors on a particular topic VS authors sending in proposals for their cookbook ideas. We also discuss what’s on the horizon for cookbook trends, and her view of just how large a food writer’s platform needs to be for consideration of publication at a large publishing house. At home, and due to space limitations, Maria carefully curates her cookbook collection. She loves books that “take [her] away”  with beautiful photography and writing, and equally as many cookbooks that offer time in the kitchen as a time to relax, or quiet yourself, rather than seeing cooking as one more chore to get done.

Listen to Episode 33 below:

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How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review for the podcast here. 

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?

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Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?

Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect outside of the Cookbook Love Podcast Facebook Group

Episode 32 l Writing and Selling a Cookbook Is an Inside Job
Episode 32 l Writing and Selling a Cookbook Is an Inside Job

Today on the podcast I share my thoughts on selling cookbooks, and even more than that with it takes to write and sell a cookbook. Behind every cookbook we own, read, write, or cook from there is a writer. A writer who has a message to share. In order to become a cookbook author, they had to become a cookbook writer first. And I see that there are a few hurdles this writer has to jump before they have a finished book. So, today, we’ll talk about these four hurdles, what they are and how we can hurdle them if we want to become a cookbook writer.

I also invite you to my upcoming free cookbook writing masterclass where I will share 7 Insider Tip about Writing a Cookbook That Agents and Publishers Might Not Tell You (Because Most of Them Have Never Written A Cookbook).  Following this masterclass with you will be able to list the 7 insider tips as well as describe my Everyday Encounter System that I teach in the Cookbook Writers Academy that guides dietitians, moms, bakers, and cooks on their journey to become confident cookbook writers. Register for the masterclass here.

Listen to Episode 32 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

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How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review for the podcast here. 

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?

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Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?

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Episode 31 l Interview with Cookbook Collector and Owner of Tablespoon Cooking Co. Jordan Hamons
Episode 31 l Interview with Cookbook Collector and Owner of Tablespoon Cooking Co. Jordan Hamons

Today on the podcast I feature an interview with Jordan Hamons. Jordan is the owner of Tablespoon Cooking Co. at the historic Findlay Market in Cincinnati, OH. Tablespoon Cooking Co. teaches home cooks how to cook good food through hands-on classes and private events.  Jordan is a cookbook collector and has been reading and using cookbooks since a very young age. In this episode, we talk about Jordan’s introduction to cookbooks with her father’s travel to New Orleans, how cookbooks were used at her various jobs, and about her monthly cookbook club at Tablespoon Cooking Co. In her spare time Jordan loves to travel –and if not by plane, by cookbook,  learning international cooking techniques and sampling food from around the globe.

Listen to Episode 31 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

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I’d love for you to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss any new episodes Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review for the podcast here. 

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?

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Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?

Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect outside of the Cookbook Love Podcast Facebook Group


7 Insider Tips About Writing a Cookbook That Agents and Publishers May Not Tell You

(Because Most of Them Have Never Written A Cookbook)

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR FREE MASTERCLASS

 


 

Episode 30 l Interview with Cookbook Collector and Full-time Traveler Melissa Bottorff-Arey
Episode 30 l Interview with Cookbook Collector and Full-time Traveler Melissa Bottorff-Arey

Today on the podcast I excited to offer this interview with Melissa Bottoroff-Arey. Melissa is the Founder of Cultivated Journey. Melissa and her husband are full-time travelers. They live and work from their motor home while traveling in the United States. Melissa has a passion for farm-to-table cuisine and teaching other travelers how they can eat local and seasonal in every community they pass through. Melissa as a cookbook collector had to purge her collection when they decided to travel full-time, as well as her experiences with cookbooks as an industry-trained chef, and cooking meals for family and friends in her motor home. We also discuss Melissa’s desire to write a cookbook and start a cookbook club for full-time travelers.

Listen to Episode 30 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

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I’d love for you to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss any new episodes Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review for the podcast here. 

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?

Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks?

Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?

Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect outside of the Cookbook Love Podcast Facebook Group

Episode 29 l Interview with Cookbook Collector, Baker, and Writer Jeremiah Duarte Bills
Episode 29 l Interview with Cookbook Collector, Baker, and Writer Jeremiah Duarte Bills

Today on the podcast I excited to offer this interview with Jeremiah Duarte Bills. Jeremiah will tell you that he comes from a dessert-obsessed family. Growing up close to his grandparents and their Portuguese heritage, he began baking in college to connect to his Portuguese roots. After his first trip to Portugal, he fell in love with the country’s dessert and baking traditions. As a self-taught baker, Jeremiah appeared on ABC’s 2016 The Great American Baking Show where he baked many Portuguese recipes. This experience connected him to people all over the world who are hungry to learn about Portuguese dessert recipes. Jeremiah is the co-host of the popular baking podcast FLOUR HOUR, is writing a Portuguese Dessert cookbook, and teaches baking classes out of his home. Jeremiah’s background is in music. He attended the world-famous Juilliard School and performed as an orchestral flutist all over the world. He lives in Sacramento, California where he keeps bees, teaches aspiring flute and piano students, and of course, bakes.

Listen to Episode 29 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

Here’s How To Subscribe

I’d love for you to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss any new episodes Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review for the podcast here. 

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?

Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks?

Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?

Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect outside of the Cookbook Love Podcast Facebook Group


Episode 28 l Seasons of Our Lives and Seasonal Cookbooks
Episode 28 l Seasons of Our Lives and Seasonal Cookbooks

Today on the podcast I share an episode about the seasons of our lives and 5 seasonally-focused cookbooks. Every week when I create a solo show for this podcast I ask myself – What can I share today that will help or inspire the people who listen to this podcast? Most often the answer comes from what’s going on in my daily life. So let’s start there as I look over the past week.

  1. This past week our son’s basketball team lost in a tournament game that ended the season. No more Tuesday and Friday night games. No more daily loads of laundry with sweaty uniforms and sock. No more meeting parents at games and cheering on the team.
  2. We started observing the season of Lent. This is 6-weeks of preparation for the renewal of our baptismal promises at Easter. No more unconscious living with food and drink and prayer. Time to pay attention to how I give, eat, and pray.
  3. And the time changed – meaning we lost an hour of sleep on Saturday and hello Daylight Savings Time! No more darkness in the evening. Bring on the light, flowers, warm weather, and spring.

Endings and beginnings – seasons – are a common thread in our everyday lives.

  • Our youngest starts to walk.
  • We start a new business.
  • We are diagnosed with a chronic disease.
  • We embark on the journey of writing a book.
  • We say goodbye to a beloved pet.
  • We watch our children leave home.
  • Our books are published.
  • Our nests are empty.

If we have the privilege of being alive, seasonal living defines us all.

Here’s the good news: what you are experiencing during this season of your life is the perfect canvas to grow and learn something new.

Want to create new content but stuck on what to do a story about?

Write or video the story about your day. Or someone else’s day. Every day is different. Always new stories to share.

Stuck in a food rut and tired of cooking or baking the same food all the time?

Cook (and bake) with the seasons. Try new foods, ingredients, and techniques. Use local foods attuned with the farmers in your area.

Want to connect with new people?

Share your story with real people on your email list, your social media accounts, your Facebook group, your local library, your local schools. People who want to connect are everywhere.

This is what the life of an inspired nutrition, food, cooking, or baking creator is all about: Seasonal Creation. Seasonal Cooking. Seasonal Connection. A place where we can create something meaningful for others. Something that helps make their lives better.

Then guess what happens?

The seasons of our lives are enriched in return. And we can’t help but grow all because we had the courage to see a new season in our life as an opportunity to create, cook, and connect.

Listen to Episode 28 below:

Episode 27 l Trends in Home Cooking
Episode 27 l Trends in Home Cooking

In this 27th episode of the podcast, I celebrate my first 6 months of podcasting with a look at a few trends I see my favorite topic for cooking – home cooking. As a registered dietitian and dedicated home cook, I pay attention to what people are eating and cooking. Here’s my take on what’s going on in the world of home-cooking.

  1. Most everyone is on a diet or following a restricted way of eating. This puts us in a group of people who are eating different ways. This could be because of allergies, intolerances, restrictions for dietary reasons, weight loss or trendy ways of eating.
  2. Technology influence on what we eat and cook. Food photography influences how we think food should look and can be discouraging if our meals don’t turn out photo-worthy. Technology also influences the way we shop for our food with online ordering, delivery, and sourcing local ingredients.
  3. Home cooking is a commitment to a process. Being a dedicated home cook requires attention to the steps of the process.
    • Planning meals is the first part of the process. I believe that cooks who plan their meals shop differently than those who prepare their meals at home but don’t plan.
    • The actual food preparation is the next steps. Cooks either cook the meal when it’s eaten or they do “meal prep” on the weekend or ahead of time is a trend in home cooking where ingredients are prepped ahead of time, or recipes are prepared ahead of time.
    • Then, sitting down and eating the meal together is part of the process. A cook can struggle to get a child or “picky eater” to eat what they cook, and they may modify what they cook based on “no one eats what I cook”. I recommend Ellen Satter’s book How to Get Your Kid To Eat But Not Too Much for the division of responsibility that states, parents are responsible for what their kids eat, a child is responsible for how much they eat.
    • Cleaning up after a meal is required by someone after the meal is over. This is a good chance for others to pitch in and help in the process of cooking.
  4. The concept of a stocked pantry is helpful if a cook knows they have on hand what they need to prepare and cook meals.
  5. A resurgence in a DIY movement is expanding our interest in fermentation, making cheese, yogurt, beer, kimchee, sauerkraut, and sourdough bread.
  6. Focus on snacks and smaller more frequent meals rather than larger meals.
  7. Influence of countertop appliances in how we are cooking such as the instant pot, rice cooker, hot pot, panini press, or air fryer.
  8. (On the podcast I said this was 10, but it’s actually 8)  In cookbooks, authors offer the opportunity to help transform the cookbook user into a better cook or a more experienced cook. Improving cooking skills takes practice, and to me, that’s what cooking every night is – practice!

Listen to Episode 27 below:

Episode 26 l Do Cookbooks Need Stories? with Maggie Green
Episode 26 l Do Cookbooks Need Stories? with Maggie Green

Hello and welcome back to another Episode of the Cookbook Love Podcast and today I am talking about cookbook stories. When I interview cookbook readers, buyers, collectors, and clubs on my podcast, Cookbook Love, I like to ask their favorite feature in a cookbook. So many say they love stories. So this brings me to the question of stories, and recipes, and do the two belong together in cookbooks? Are cookbooks mere instruction manuals, or do they do more for us?

The stories we tell about our lives, kitchens, meals, and cooking are important. It helps people see themselves in us and offers a place to connect outside of the recipes. This is also true for the stories we share about others. Their traditions, meals, communities, and cultures have a place in the discussion of food and cooking.

Here are a few things to consider:

1. Many cookbooks contain stories and are constructed of stories: A good example of this type of cookbook/book is Amy Zaring’s Flavors from Home: Refugees in Kentucky Share Their Stories and Comfort Foods. This book is all about stories of refugees, in their kitchens, cooking their foods from home.  

But cookbooks aren’t always instruction manuals. Often, they tell deeper stories of the dish, whether its the history of the ingredients or the way the author came to the recipe.If you love that depth, you may enjoy this list of  8 Cookbooks You Can Read Like Books. This list validates the love for a story around food and cooking.

2. Many cookbooks don’t contain stories and are instruction manuals – but as in The Food Lab – the narrative and the book itself is a place for J. Kenji Lopez-Alt to tell about his experiments with food and cooking in the kitchen in long form.  And the popularity of Betty Crocker and Better Homes and Gardens Cookbooks over the year are cookbooks without a story, backed by corporate test kitchens, although Betty Crocker was given a fictitious face and persona to make readers and buyers think a person was behind the book.

3. Some don’t like the story, they just want recipes and for some, in particular, when searching for recipes on blogs, the stories annoy as described in the piece in Slate magazine.

4. Agents do love the story part, it’s what sets you apart. I’ve had agents tell my clients this.  Julia Turshen talks in this Eater piece, with Nik Sharma about voice, and how this was something their editor desired for their books.  

So it seems that the desire for stories is a little bit all over the place, from story-heavy to no stories. So where does this leave a cookbook writer? I still recommend to new cookbook writers that they include stories in their work.

First, to write stories is good practice. Tell a story and share a recipe. Tell a story and share a recipe. Practice, practice, practice. Writing practice of this sort leads us down the path

Episode 25 l What’s on the Cookbook Horizon in 2019 with Jenny Hartin of The Cookbook Junkies and Publicity Director for Eat Your Books
Episode 25 l What’s on the Cookbook Horizon in 2019 with Jenny Hartin of The Cookbook Junkies and Publicity Director for Eat Your Books

Today is a jam-packed episode as I welcome back for her 2nd interview, Jenny Hartin, of The Cookbook Junkies and publicity director for Eat Your Books.  Today in our conversation, Jenny and I discuss what’s on the horizon for cookbooks in 2019 and new books Jenny’s excited about including Gnocchi Solo Gnocchi and The New Pie. We also discuss the work done by Eat Your Books in their Best of the best cookbooks list for 2018, as well as the upcoming reprint of the classic dessert cookbook The Last Course by Claudia Fleming, pastry chef at Gramercy Tavern. The Last Course, as a used book commands over $80/copy, so the new revision is highly anticipated as a way to access this classic book at a lower price point. Jenny and I also discuss cookbook award programs, including how books are submitted to these awards, and how the books are judged, and the method that Eat Your Books uses to look at book sales for their yearly cookbook popularity lists. One last topic we discuss is an article in the Washington Post about Magnolia Table by Joanna Gaines. This book sold over 1M copies but didn’t make the “Best of 2018” list published by WashPo. How does this happen that over 1M people buy the book, and presumably like the book, but the WashPo doesn’t give it any kudos on their lists?

Listen to Episode 25 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

Gourmand Book Awards

IACP Cookbook Awards

James Beard Cookbook Awards

Here’s How To Subscribe

I’d love for you to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss any new episodes Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review for the podcast here. 

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?

Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks?

Do

Episode 24 l What is a recipe headnote and why do they matter with Maggie Green
Episode 24 l What is a recipe headnote and why do they matter with Maggie Green

Today on the podcast I talk about recipe headnotes. Recipe headnotes are an optional part of a recipe and their appearance determined by the recipe-writing style of the author or the publisher. (To learn more about recipe-writing style you may enjoy listening to Episode 11). But, for many of the reasons I’ll discuss today, cookbook lovers and cooks in general love recipe headnotes. They add personality and liven up the writing in a cookbook. It’s up to an author if they want to use headnotes in their cookbook, as well as what information an author wants to include in a headnote, but there are many items that can be covered with a recipe headnote:

  1. Introduces a recipe
  2. Draws the reader into the recipe
  3. Lends personality to the recipe
  4. Alerts the cook to special ingredients or techniques
  5. Provides tips on preparation or presentation
  6. Acknowledges a source of recipe inspiration or gives attribution
  7. Gives recipe history or origin
  8. Helps the cook envision the dish
  9. Provides serving tips
  10. Discusses ingredients in the recipe

Listen to Episode 24 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

Here’s How To Subscribe

I’d love for you to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss any new episodes Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus,  iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review for the podcast here. 

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?

Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks?

Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?

Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect outside of the Cookbook Love Podcast Facebook Group