Episode 2| Interview with Jenny Hartin of Cookbook Junkies Facebook Group and Eat Your Books
Episode 2| Interview with Jenny Hartin of Cookbook Junkies Facebook Group and Eat Your Books

In this episode, Maggie interviews Jenny Hartin. Jenny is the owner and administrator of  Cookbook Junkies Facebook Group and cookbookjunkies.com as well as the Director of Publicity for Eat Your Books. Jenny shares her introduction into the cookbook space as a cook and cookbook collector, why she started Cookbook Junkies and her role as Director of Publicity for Eat Your Books.

Listen to Episode 002 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

Here’s How To Subscribe

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How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus, iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review right here.

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?
Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks?
Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?
Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect outside of the Cookbook Love Podcast Facebook Group.

 

 

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Episode 1| Interview with Kelsey Banfield of Little Snack Newsletter
Episode 1| Interview with Kelsey Banfield of Little Snack Newsletter

In this episode to the podcast, Maggie interview Kelsey Banfield of The Little Snack Newsletter. Kelsey shares about her love of organizing her cookbooks by color, what she learned from her mom about cookbooks, and more about her newsletter The Snack Cookbook Club.

Listen to Episode 001 below:

Things We Mention In This Episode:

Here’s How To Subscribe

I’d love for you to get notified when I release new episodes so you don’t miss any new episodes. Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

How to Leave a Review:

And, I’d love for you to leave a rating and review. I want to know what you think of the podcast and how I can make this podcast one you love to listen to and share with your friends. Plus, iTunes tells me that podcast reviews are really important and the more reviews the podcast has the easier it will be to get the podcast in front of more people, which is the ultimate goal. You can leave a review right here.

Let’s Keep The Conversation Going…

Do you have an idea for a cookbook concept?
Would you like to know more about writing cookbooks?
Do you collect cookbooks and want to be interviewed on the show?
Comment below and share your story or visit me on Instagram which is currently my favorite way to connect outside of the Cookbook Love Podcast Facebook Group.

 

 

 …

Food Trends 2017
Food Trends 2017

It’s time for my annual Food Trends update, this time of course focusing on predictions and trends for 2017 in food, nutrition, restaurants, and ingredients.

I find the focus on regional American cuisines and plant-based eating refreshing as well as the return to home cooked meals for Generation Z. This is a lot to digest, but included are some nice links to PDFs from Sterling-Rice Group, Baum + Whiteman, and the National Restaurant Association’s What’s Hot Culinary Forecast for 2017, as well as a list from Global Food Forums, that they keep updated as new lists and trend reports are published.

Global Food Forums: 2017 Food Trends
Top trend lists in food, beverage, and nutritional product trends for 2017

National Restaurant Association: What’s Hot 2017 Culinary Forecast

Sterling-Rice Groups: 10 Cutting Edge Culinary Trends for 2017

NPD: Predictions for 2017 and Beyond

Washington Post: Plant proteins, healthy fats and more 2017 food trends

Tasting Table: Our predictions for the most delicious food and drink tends of the year

Eater: Every Single Food Trend That’s Been Predicted for 2017

Kim Severson: The Dark (and Often Dubious Art of Forecasting Food Trends)

Linked-in David Craig: 2017 Food Trends Roundup

Oldways: Five Food Trends to Make 2017 The Best Year Ever

QSR: 12 Fast Food Trends for 2017

International Food Information Council Foundation: Functional foods, sustainability, protein, CRISPR, What’s Healthy

Baum + Whiteman International Food + Restaurant Consultants:
13 Hottest Food & Beverage Trends in Restaurant & Hotel Dining for 2017

Cookbook author and culinary dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors in the process of writing cookbooks, cookbook proposals, and building their author platform. Download her checklist “Am I Ready to Write A Cookbook?”

A Taste of Kentucky Cookbook: Behind the Scenes
A Taste of Kentucky Cookbook: Behind the Scenes

Last week, I began the testing phase of recipes for my next cookbook A Taste of Kentucky: Favorite Recipes from The Bluegrass State (Farcountry Press 2016). For this project I have the good fortune of collaborating with a talented Kentucky photographer named Sarah Jane. Our Tuesday session was great fun. I cooked, while she chased the light around my house and photographed the finished dishes.

The photographed pancakes are Buttermilk Pancakes with Whipped Bourbon Vanilla Butter from The Red River Rockhouse in Campton, KY. This is one example of a recipe we worked on last week. While shooting this particular photo, Sarah Jane instructed me to pour a thin stream of syrup onto the pancakes. While I poured, she took pictures of the syrup stream flowing onto the pancakes. It was a beautiful shot. Just for fun, she also shot this picture of the resulting puddle of syrup around the pancakes. I call this Buttermilk Pancakes en Dolce Brodo (in sweet broth).

A Taste of Kentucky should be a beautiful and delicious cookbook with close to 100 recipes from the best chefs, restaurants, inns, food producers, and writers across Kentucky. While you wait for this book, I share a pancake recipe from The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook. Try to control yourself with the syrup.

Mile-High Buttermilk Pancakes
Makes about eighteen 4-inch pancakes

Not made from a mix, these pancakes are a soft, fluffy, rather tall pancake. Vary the size if desired. For a 6-inch pancake use 1/2 cup of batter, for a 5-inch pancake use 1/3 cup batter, and for a 4-inch pancake use 1/4 cup batter, and for silver dollar pancakes, or pancakes the tiny size of a silver dollar coin, use a tablespoon to portion out the batter.

2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 large eggs
2 cups plus 2 tablespoons buttermilk
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter, melted 

In a large bowl stir together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. In another bowl, mix together the eggs, buttermilk, and melted butter. Make a hole in the center of the flour mixture and pour in the buttermilk mixture. Mix the dry ingredients together until the ingredients are blended, but not smooth. Let stand for 5 minutes. Heat griddle over medium-high heat until water flicked on the surface beads up and dances around. Use a 1/4-cup measure to scoop the batter onto the griddle. Cook about 3 minutes or until bubbles form on the surface of the batter, the edges look dry, and the bottom of the pancake is lightly browned. Turn the pancake and continue to cook until the other side of the pancake is browned, about 2 more minutes. Serve immediately or keep warm in the oven with warm maple syrup.…

Healthy Kitchens, Healthy Lives

Healthy Kitchens, Healthy Lives is an exciting partnership between Harvard Medical School Osher Institute and the Culinary Institute of America. These prestigious institutions sponsor hands-on workshops bridging nutrition science, health care, and culinary arts. In a nutshell, these folks work tirelessly to promote the kitchen as the center of a medical system for improving the health of society. They believe if they teach people how to cook, and enjoy food in a way that doesn’t leave feelings of deprivation, physically or socially, our medical system and the health of Americans can change for the better. I don’t know about you, but I’m all for the concept of cooking and sharing food as the cornerstone of health care.…