• Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 13

    BRAIN TRAINING
    When I travel I like to ask my brain how I can offer value in my business for my clients. With the change of scenery it comes up with lots of ideas.

    Have you ever tried to ask your brain a specific question? My business coach taught me to direct my brain. She says an undirected brain is like an unsupervised toddler. It can get into trouble.

    Brains that are unattended like to worry or ruminate on made up stories about what we think others are thinking.

    Direct your brain: How can I best use my time today? What is the one thing I can do to offer more value for my clients? How can I help my audience get results ahead of time? What is a new way to offer information of value to my audience? Try it. Your brain is amazing. Put it to work for you, not against you.

    SPRING 2018 COOKBOOKS
    Spring is one of the prime seasons for publishing cookbooks!

    Here are some links to Spring 2018 Cookbook Reviews:
    Spring 2018 Cookbook Preview: The 37 New Cookbooks to Buy This Spring

    Every Spring 2018 Cookbook That Matters

    The 18 Spring Cookbooks We’re Most Excited About

    17 New Spring Cookbooks We Can’t Wait to Stain

     

    Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

    Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

    Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

    Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

    I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

    Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

    Checklist
    An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

    Cookbook Writing Workbook

    What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

    10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

  • 5 Secrets to Consistent Content Creation

    One of my superpowers is creating consistent content for my business.

    *Regular blog posts since 2010

    *Four cookbooks since 2011

    *Weekly newsletters since 2012

    Do you struggle with regular content creation? Do you start strong with a good idea for a book, blog, or newsletter, but then fizzle out and lack consistency in the producing of the blog posts, newsletters, or cookbooks?

    Consistency is king. Customers like consistency. It’s trustworthy. Publishers like consistency. It’s dependable. Your readers like consistency. They want to hear from you. They like what you write about.

    In order to help you move from struggling and overwhelmed, I want to share my five secrets to consistent content creation.

    1. Decide if you want to create consistent content. You can do this if you want to. If your answer is yes, then let’s do it! If your answer is no, that’s ok. Quit beating yourself up and move on to another way to spend your time.

    2. Pick one day and a specific time: I write newsletter and blog post content once a week on Mondays. I spend no more than two hours to do this. I get it done and don’t have to worry about the newsletter or blog post until the next Monday. On Mondays, my sweet spot is between the hours of  8 – 10 am. I set myself up for success. I don’t schedule phone calls during this time. I don’t run errands during this time. I don’t go get coffee with a friend during this time. This time is for my content. Each and every Monday morning. For you, it might be midnight – 2 am. The time doesn’t matter. Just pick a time where you are awake, alert, focused. And I hear what you’re thinking: but I’ve got little kids, I have a job, I have so much to do, I’m so busy. If that’s the case, go back to #1 and decide.

    3. Get yourself in a good feeling place before you write. I like to show up on Mondays (and every day, quite frankly) refreshed and ready. For me, this means I have completed my morning routine and I’m cleaned up for the day. I can’t produce when I’m sitting around feeling and smelling like I just crawled out of bed. I work better when I’m clean, dressed, smell good, and my household tasks that I do on Monday mornings are underway.

    4. Show up at your computer or laptop. Sit down (or stand up if you want to), and write (or create). By the time I actually sit down, I have a topic in mind to write about. These topics pop into my head in a variety of ways, but most often they occur to me during my morning routine. (This routine is a no-brainer and consists of some quiet coffee time, breakfast with my son, clean up the kitchen, shower, and morning notebook time.) You’d be amazed how many ideas pop into my head when I’m focused on other activities. The biggest take away here is to have a way to capture the ideas on your phone’s notepad or in a notebook. Creative ideas flow all the time. Write the ideas down. And then, when you sit down to write, you don’t have to think of ideas, all you have to do is expand on them.

    5. Control your brain. There are times when I sit down that my brain says, “OK, this is too much. You need to quit writing so much. Skip this one time – it’s not going to matter anyway. Head back to the kitchen. Get a snack. Watch some YouTube or scroll through Instagram. There’s no reason you should keep writing this much.” This is what our brains do. When we evolve, grow, write, create content, our brains think there’s danger lurking. It tells us the way we stay safe is to stay the same and not rock the boat. For a few minutes, I occasionally entertain my brain’s messages. I consider that I should stop writing newsletters, blog posts, and books. But I know better. I can outsmart my brain.

    Give these secrets a try. My hope is that they take you from the feelings of struggle, overwhelm, and confusion, to feeling good, more consistent with your content, in control of your brain. If you master this, I know you can do absolutely anything!


    Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

    Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

    Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

    Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

    I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

    Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

    Checklist
    An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

    Cookbook Writing Workbook

    What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

    10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

     

     

  • If you want to write a cookbook: You have to write

    This may be a rant of sorts, but I have something on my mind.

    We all have dreams.

    Dreams to own our own home. Raise a family. Live a life of travel and excitement.  Some dreams may be more specific such as open a restaurant, buy season tickets to the New Orleans Pelicans, or live on a wooden houseboat in Sausalito, CA. You get the picture. Your dreams are your dreams. Don’t let anyone ever tell you otherwise.

    But, if you have a dream of writing a cookbook, or a blog, or a newsletter for your audience, you have to get practical at some point.

    Practical, not in the sense, that “you-can’t-write-a-cookbook-because-you’re-not-a-celebrity” practical (I don’t buy into that one. You’re looking at a four-time cookbook author who is not a TV star), or, “no-one-is-reading-your-blog-anyway” practical,  but practical in the sense that “you-have-to-write” practical.  “The-words-have-to-get-on-the-page” practical.  or “Talk-your-book-and-have-it-transcribed” practical.

    Here’s what I mean.

    This blog post didn’t write itself. My cookbooks didn’t write themselves. And, my weekly newsletter isn’t produced by a content creator other than me.

    I’m sitting here at my computer, in my office, writing these words.

    My fingers are typing on a black keyboard. There’s a load of laundry in the dryer, the dog is barking at people lined up at my neighbor’s house for an estate sale, and my college-aged daughter just texted me about moving out of her dorm. This is called LIFE – all the things and people and stuff we do in between the time when we write our cookbooks and our blog posts and newsletters.

    Truth be told, I created the space and energy to be sitting here. I’m not too busy, too tired, too overwhelmed, or too exhausted, to sit here with my fingers on my keyboard and write. For this is what writers do. We write whether we “feel” like it or not. We show up for ourselves. We create content. We write books. We get them published. We send newsletters. And, deep down we know that if we don’t write, none of the books, blogs, or newsletters happen.

    Here’s the upshot: dream all you want. I love dreams. I love living dreams. I adore watching my clients speak their dreams and make them come true. But, like I tell them: if you dream of a cookbook, or a regularly updated blog, or a newsletter for your audience –  you have to sit down and write.

    No matter how busy you think you are, no matter how much time you don’t think you have, no matter how overwhelmed you feel, no matter the design of your blog, or your logo, or your Instagram feed. If you want to produce a piece written content, you have to put your fingers on your proverbial black keyboard, or your pen to the notebook, and WRITE.

    Writing takes time.

    Writing takes up space in your day, or your evening, or your morning, or your night.

    Writing means we’re not doing other things like Facebooking, Instagramming, pinning, shopping, or overwhelming about “not having time” to write. (Hint: if you’re reading this, you have time to write.)

    Writing is more about routine than is it about degrees, diplomas, or …. (quick someone please think of a word that starts with d).

    Writing is a requirement if you want to write anything.

    This is where the rubber meets the road.

    Do you dream of writing a cookbook?

    Sit down and write.

    Do you dream of posting regular content on your blog?

    Sit down and write.

    Do you dream of emailing a newsletter to your email list every week?

    Sit down and write.

    Or stand up and write. I don’t care. Just write.

    I used to say discomfort was the currency of your dreams.

    Today I say that if you’re still with me: writing is probably the currency of your dreams.

    Why aren’t you writing?


    Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

    Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

    Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

    Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

    I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

    Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

    Checklist
    An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

    Cookbook Writing Workbook

    What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

    10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

  • 11 Tips From Q1

    It’s the end of the 1st quarter of the year, and I’m fired up about my first 12 weeks of the year. In early January, I set intentions about my coaching programs and moved forward with positive action. Here’s what has happened in my first quarter along with some advice and tips for you and your business:

    1. TRIM YOUR EMAIL LIST
    I have an active and engaged email list. And we’re trimming the fat. If subscribers aren’t opening the emails, they will be deleted. (Don’t worry, if you’re reading this you’re good to go!) Don’t be afraid to trim down your list to those who want to hear from you. It helps engagement with your regular, consistent emails.

    2. CREATE REGULAR, CONSISTENT CONTENT
    I continue weekly blog posts on cookbook writing, mindset, and productivity. When a new client finds me, it’s often because of a Google search. They join my list. We get in touch. They buy a program. For sure, I will keep up my regular consistent blog posts. If you’re not creating regular content in your business (blog posts, live streams, videos, something, anything) it’s time to start. Be sure to read my latest blog post with Clotilde Dusoulier, author of Tasting Paris, noted as one of the 37 new cookbooks for Spring 2018 by Epicurious.

    3. GO LIVE
    I presented two webinars on cookbook writing and it was fun and a great way to give results ahead of time to my audience. I plan to provide more online LIVE events in Q2. Going live and sharing your expertise is the wave of the future.

    4. OFFER VIP PROGRAMS
    I created a VIP level offer for my mastermind group. This is a way to stay connected to those who want to keep working with me and offer them more value, more opportunities to connect, all at the same price. Consider a VIP level if you don’t have one in your program. One benefit for my VIPs is the opportunity to promote their work in the Tasty Client News section at the end of my newsletter. I hope you love my VIPs as much as I do.

    5. CREATE LIVE WORKSHOPS
    I created a 6-Week LIVE Cookbook Publishing Workshop. Each week, for 6 weeks,  I showed up live to present the class and answer Q & A. It was well-received and now I have the videos to use for other purposes. More content creation – yay! I’m thinking now of my 6-WEEK LIVE course for Q2. Keep your eyes peeled.

    6. TRY SOMETHING NEW
    My Cookbook Publishing Blueprint phone calls were a new idea. Through this phone call and simple set of questions, I worked 1:1 with several clients and set them on their path to cookbook publication. Through LIVE Zoom calls, we discussed their projects and set up a timeline for their work. These new, one-time calls are fun and a great way to connect with first-time cookbook authors who just need a little nudge in the right direction.

    7. LISTEN AND APPRECIATE
    I started listening more and appreciating more. Through my routines and my self-coaching, I feel good every day. From there it’s easy to take positive action. In the midst of activities that are often bogged down with negative stories: parenting teens, busy lives, travel, college-aged kids, and running a business, this is key – I make a choice every day to work to feel good, take positive intentional actions, and watch my dreams of building an online business come true.

    8. KEEP DOING WHAT’S WORKING
    I continue my Hungry For A Cookbook Mastermind Group, with new members enrolled for the next session. This program really lights me up. So many ideas, so many interesting first-time cookbook authors – all across the world. I am so proud of them all. And, it’s officially, a global program this year as we welcomed a member from another country. This provides evidence of the power of online reach and how an online classroom space like Zoom can really bring us all together, no matter where we live. So fun.

    9. MANAGE YOUR ENERGY
    I realized that part of my time management skills is really energy management skills. I make choices about sleep, movement, nutrition to keep my physical energy level high. With a good energy level during the day and focused positive action, as a result, I accomplished most of what I set out to do in January. I know that my ability to do any and all of this is controlled by my thinking and that if it’s going to be, it’s up to me!

    10. WRITE PRINT MATERIALS
    Work continues behind the scenes by my publisher for my next two print cookbooks. I have returned 2 sets of edits and we are getting ready to create the index. This is what I love about traditional publishing. While the publisher works their magic behind the scenes, I get to do other things! And then I have new print books to promote.

    11. PLAN FOR Q2
    It’s never too late to start something new or perfect something you’re already doing. And remember, you’re doing just what you need to be doing right now. Without looking back with regret or negative emotion, let’s look forward. What can you do in Q2 to expand your business?  What content are you providing your audience that they love? What offer can you make to your clients? Set some goals for the next 12 weeks. With decision and focus we can all move forward in our businesses and books.

    Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. If you want to write a cookbook, and wonder if you’re ready, download her 11-point checklist Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?

  • Cookbook Author Interview Series: Clotilde Dusoulier: Build a List of Emails That You Own

    Photo Credit: Fabien Courmont

    In March 2009, I wrote my first cookbook proposal for One Year in My Kentucky Kitchen. (The was ultimately published as The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook in 2011).

    In a cookbook proposal, it’s important to identify cookbooks that you like or that you believe are competitors to your proposed book. This gives the agent or editor a glimpse of your “vision” for your proposed cookbook.

    One of the cookbooks I identified in my proposal was Chocolate and Zucchini: Daily Adventures in a Parisian Kitchen by Clotilde Dusoulier. Here’s what I wrote “Based on a blog by the same name, this sweet book contains four-color photography and a unique design. I like the size and “feel” of this paperback cookbook.”  At the time I was very into how I wanted my cookbook to “feel” when someone used it. And, based on that criteria, I identified Clotilde’s book as a book I admired.

    Now here we are in 2018. Clotilde just published her fifth cookbook and my third and fourth cookbooks will be published this fall of 2018. Clotilde lives in Paris. I live in Kentucky. Despite living across the ocean from each other, our paths crossed in a coaching program. 

    Life delivers the most wonderful coincidences and it happens to me all the time. I cross paths with someone. I don’t see them for a while, and then all of the sudden our paths cross again, as we weave in and out of each other’s lives. 

    I admire Clotilde and her work. And one day, I think we are going to meet, if not in Paris, then here in the beautiful state of Kentucky. And if you’re still reading this introduction, I hope you enjoy this interview with Clotilde, about her fifth book, Tasting Paris, which as listed as one of the 37 New Cookbooks To Buy This Spring, by Epicurious. 

    What is the name of your cookbook(s)?

    My new cookbook was published on March 20, 2018, and it is titled Tasting Paris: 100 Recipes to Eat Like a Local.

    This is the book I’ve long wanted to write to share the many and wonderful flavors of Paris from a local’s perspective. A cliché-free Paris that reflects the way real Parisians eat today.

    Is this your first cookbook?

    It is my fifth book! I have previously published:

    Chocolate & Zucchini: Daily Adventures in a Parisian Kitchen (my first cookbook, containing classics from my own and my family’s French repertoire)

    Clotilde’s Edible Adventures in Paris (a guide to Paris restaurants and food shops)

    Edible French: Tasty Expressions and Cultural Bites (a little book of French expressions related to food, with watercolor illustrations)

    The French Market Cookbook: Vegetarian Recipes from my Parisian Kitchen (a French vegetarian cookbook)

    Do you have a food blog? Was your blog a driving force in obtaining a contract?

    I am the author of a food blog called Chocolate & Zucchini, which I’ve been running for 14 1/2 years. I’m an OG blogger, and I was actually the first French person to ever create a food blog, back in 2003.

    The blog is what started everything for me, including the opportunity to write my first cookbook, which came out in 2007. It is through Chocolate & Zucchini that I was able to establish myself as a food writer, hone my craft and my voice, show the style of content I like to create and embody my values and my work ethic.

    What compelled you to want to write a cookbook?

    I’ve wanted to be a published writer ever since I first learned how to write, around age 5 or 6. I’d always thought I would write fiction, but when I started my blog, I realized writing about food came to me more easily — it was a topic that endlessly inspired me — and that my work resonated with my readers. As soon as Chocolate & Zucchini got some press attention in the beginning of 2004, I started to think of a career change: I was a software engineer back then! Writing a book seemed like a natural step in that direction.

    Can you tell us how you were offered a contract for your first cookbook?

    One day I got an email from a reader of my website who was also an editor at a big publishing house. He didn’t publish cookbooks himself, but he wanted to know if I had thought of writing a cookbook. He offered to introduce me to a couple of agents who might like to work with me. One of them was Claudia Cross. We clicked, and she’s been my agents ever since — it’s been almost fourteen years now.

    I then got to work writing a book proposal, which took about a year because I was still working a full-time job and running my food blog on the side. When it was finally ready, we presented it to a dozen publishers, got a couple of offers, and went with the offer from Broadway Books, an imprint of Random House. I took it as a sign of the Universe and quit my day job to focus on the book and my blog full time. This was July of 2005, and I’ve never looked back!

    Do aspiring cookbook authors need food blogs? If no, what other ways can they promote their work?

    My blog has been instrumental both in getting book deals and in getting the word out about my books. Social media platforms such as Instagram can be quite powerful in establishing an online presence as well, but it’s like building on rented land — the rules and algorithms can change overnight — so it’s important to build a list of emails that you own, to have a way of reaching out to people who resonate with your work. I think it’s very hard for a standalone book to succeed nowadays without some kind of online home.

    What are your thoughts about an aspiring author, who’s an unknown food entity, writing a cookbook?

    The keyword you’ll hear from every publisher and every agent is “platform”, that is to say, some kind of way to build, nurture, and reach an audience who is interested in your work.

    You don’t have to be an international star or have 100K followers to get a book published — especially with the many self-publishing options available nowadays — but you do need the platform to promote it. Even with traditional publishers: they will do a media push around the time of the release, but it’s on the author to keep promoting it and get it in front of new would-be buyers all the time.

    So building a platform seems like a good step zero, even as you develop your idea for a cookbook, a book proposal, etc.

    What was the biggest challenge in completing your manuscript?

    Managing such a long-term, complex project on one’s own is the real challenge. I’ve gotten much better at it with experience, but I remember how daunting it seemed those first few times! Now I know to establish a very clear and realistic schedule for the different phases of book-writing, with milestones along the way, and plenty of buffer-time to account for life stuff that will surely happen along the way.

    What was your biggest fear when writing your cookbook?

    I’ve come a long way since the writing of my first cookbook, twelve years ago. Back then, my biggest fears were “What if nobody cares?” and “What if there is some huge mistake in the recipes?” Living with fear #1 simply required blind faith; fear #2 strengthened my resolve to triple-test the recipes (and more!) and pay meticulous attention through every proofreading step.

    Now that I’m on my fifth book, that I’m in my late thirties, and that I’ve done a lot of work on thought management, I can honestly say I am without fear. I’ve put my best professional self in this work, and I think it is a very strong book that has been beautifully produced by my publishing team. Do I dearly hope people love it? Yes. Will I be disappointed if they don’t? Yes. Can I please everybody? No. Will life go on either way? Yes. 🙂

    Tasting Paris is now available for order, and we are offering a bonus for people who order the book. It’s an audio tour of my favorite market streets in Paris, in my neighborhood of Montmartre, and buyers will get it for free when they submit their order receipt here.

    Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. If you want to write a cookbook, and wonder if you’re ready, download her 11-point checklist Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?

  • Are You A Pro?

    I’m fascinated with pros.

    (And if you haven’t read Steven Pressfield’s book Turning Pro, I recommend you head to the library or bookstore.)

    Here is what Steven Pressfield says about pros. And, I’ve added a few of my own.

    • Pros show up every day even when no one else looks or claps.
    • Pros stay on the job.
    • Pros are patient.
    • Pros seek order.
    • Pros act in the face of fear.
    • Pros accept no excuses from themselves.
    • Pros are prepared.
    • Pros ask for help.
    • Pros master techniques of their craft.
    • Pros practice.
    • Pros don’t take success or failure personally.
    • Pros endure adversity.
    • Pros reinvent themselves.
    • Pros are recognized by other pros.
    • Pros use their mornings effectively.
    • Pros are courageous.
    • Pros are committed.
    • Pros focus.
    • Pros decide.
    • Pros work. (Steven Pressfield says, “Amateurs Tweet. Pros Work.” Ouch.)
    • Pros have integrity even to themselves.
    • Pros live in today, not the past stories.
    • Pros defer gratification.
    • Pros aren’t afraid of negative emotion, in fact, they allow it and act in spite of it.
    • Pros don’t wait for inspiration to sit down and focus.
    • Pros act in anticipation of inspiration.
    • Pros don’t give their power to their ex, kids, spouse, mother, father, co-workers, clients, or neighbors.
    • Pros help others.
    • Pros are consistent.
    • Pros rock.

    Cookbook author and culinary dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors in the process of writing cookbooks, cookbook proposals, and building their author platform. Download her checklist “Am I Ready to Write A Cookbook?”

  • You’re On The Team!

    My youngest son’s basketball team qualified for the Kentucky High School Sweet Sixteen (state basketball tournament.)

    Out of over 200 teams, 16 are left.

    He gets to ride the bus with the team. Stay in a hotel with the team. Eat with the team. Warm up with the team. Play with the team.. He’s so excited for this opportunity. It’s really the icing on the cake.

    Back in January, he hit a wall. Practices were becoming a grind. He asked me if it was all worth it.

    I said yes, but you’re either in or you’re out. And if you’ve chosen to play the sport, and they’ve chosen you to be on the team, you owe it to them to be all in.

    Do you ever feel like that as a mom, first-time cookbook author, business owner? Hit the wall? Ask if it’s all worth it?

    Here’s my advice:

    • Go all in.
    • Do it all because you’ve chosen to be a mom and to own your own business.
    • Drop the hard, struggle, overwhelm.
    • Frame your life differently.
    • Enjoy the freedom and flexibility running your own business brings.
    • Plan ahead and spend Thursday morning at a pep-rally or help with a spelling test at school.
    • Lead with your life.
    • Practice. Hit the wall. Bounce back. Enjoy your reward.
    • You’re on the team and the team needs you.

    Cookbook author and culinary dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors in the process of writing cookbooks, cookbook proposals, and building their author platform. Download her checklist “Am I Ready to Write A Cookbook?”

  • Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 12

    $200 Cookbook

    This is older news, but did you ever hear about Tom Brady’s $200 Cookbook?

    He created a system and wrote a book about it. It sold out at $200. What’s stopping you from creating your system and a book for your audience?

    Recipe Copyright Projection:

    As a member of IACP (International Association of Culinary Professionals), I have the opportunity to attend their webinars.

    Last month IACP hosted an excellent webinar presented by attorney Joy Butler.

    In her webinar, Joy talked about protecting, sharing, and adapting recipes.

    I thought you might enjoy her blog post that summarizes her answers to a series of questions asked on this webinar about copyright protecting for recipes.

    Cookbook author and culinary dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors in the process of writing cookbooks, cookbook proposals, and building their author platform. Download her checklist “Am I Ready to Write A Cookbook?”

  • Consuming VS Creating

    One of my favorite things to do is consume. I love to read. Eat. Drink red wine. Watch reruns of Downton Abbey and The Great British Baking Show. Listen to podcasts. Look at Instagram. Read the Wall Street Journal. And the obituaries in our local paper. I mean who doesn’t?

    • Some consuming is educational. We learn.
    • Some consuming is relaxing. We take care of ourselves.
    • Some consuming is essential to life. We have to eat.
    • Some consuming has a net negative effect. Like drinking too much wine. It’s called a hangover.
    • Some consuming is at the expense of the work we need to be doing. My coach calls that buffering. Others call it procrastination.
      Consuming rarely offers value to others.

    Creating is where our power lies.

    • Creating content, programs, and connections.
    • Creating meals and a picked-up home.
    • Creating recipes or book manuscripts.
    • Creating value and making an offer of a sale.

    It’s important to balance consuming with creating.

    Your clients, customers, audience, and family may thank you.

    But, they may not.

    Even if your creation goes unnoticed or not appreciated,  you’ll know that you’re doing the work.  And that’s what it’s all about.

    Cookbook author and culinary dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors in the process of writing cookbooks, cookbook proposals, and building their author platform. Download her checklist “Am I Ready to Write A Cookbook?”

  • Worry Has No Upside

    My oldest son left last Friday to study abroad in Austria for 5 months.

    He was so sweet telling me goodbye at the airport and as his mom, I feel a whole range of emotions, from pride to worry.

    I hugged him and told him if there’s anything at all he needed or that I could do for him just give me the word. As a mom, you all know this. We’d do anything for our kids.

    I’ve never had a child so far away from home. I must admit – it feels really strange. Suddenly,  it feels like part of my body is walking around on the continent of Europe. He’s been in college for over 2 years, so it’s not the separation that is new. It’s the distance that makes this experience feel unique.

    Despite the distance, I have decided not to worry about the million things I could worry about.

    There is no upside to worry. I’d rather sleep, eat well, run my business, have fun, and trust that all is well than worry.

    Worry takes up space in my brain. I could use this space for inspiration, ideas, and creativity instead.

    Worry is a feeling that comes from my thoughts.

    I can control my thoughts and make deliberate choices about what I’ll think about.

    Here are the thoughts I choose to think about his being away for 5 months:

    • All is well
    • He is ready for this
    • This is an amazing opportunity for him to study the German language and learn
    • I appreciate all the ways his university has set up this program for their students to take advantage of
    • He has succeeded in applying and getting to Austria
    • He has always wanted to do this and now’s his time
    • He paid attention to other students, learned from them, and here he fulfilling a dream
    • He coordinated the efforts that studying abroad requires from applications to student visas and immunizations to airline reservations
    • I can handle this
    • He can handle this
    • I focus on what I can control while he is there
    • I am learning as a mom grow to from situations such as this

    Those thoughts make me feel good, peaceful, and calm.

    And, that’s a much better place than worry.

    And it’s all possible with a change in the way I think.

    If you tend to worry, ask yourself what are thoughts that make you worry.

    Make a list of alternative (believable) thoughts instead and then practice them.

    It’s time to kiss worry goodbye.

    Cookbook author and culinary dietitian Maggie Green coaches aspiring cookbook authors in the process of writing cookbooks, cookbook proposals, and building their author platform. Download her checklist “Am I Ready to Write A Cookbook?”

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