• 6 Tips for Well-Being

    Being a mom can sometimes feel lonely. How can that be when surrounded by hustle, bustle, kids, and activity.

    I venture to guess that in the absence of other mental illnesses, what we are lonely for is a connection with ourselves. When we’re raising children, we often lose touch with the best version of who we really are.

    I’m here to say it’s not selfish to connect with you. Here’s my recipe for well-being that I try my best to practice.

    1. Rest and sleep. There’s no heroism in sleep-deprivation. I literally used to love nap time when my kids were really little because I could take a power nap too. That’s not as necessary now, because my nighttime sleep isn’t interrupted, but I can’t overestimate the power of rest and sleep for your self-care.

    2. Eat well. Choose foods that fuel your mom-self and give you energy. For me this means I limit sugar, alcohol, and simple carbohydrates from chips, crackers, cakes, cookies, and ice cream. I drink a lot of fresh water, eat a lot of colorful vegetables, lean protein, and healthy fats. My energy levels are great and I feel good most of the time. I attribute that physical feeling of well-being to what I eat and to my sleep.

    3. Choose thoughts that serve you. Your environment will prove true whatever you think, so deliberately focus on what you want to show up in your life. If you think you’re kids are cranky, or that you’re crazy busy guess what? Your kids act cranky and you feel crazy busy. (Below is my favorite YouTube video on this brainpower center called the Reticular Activating System.)

    4. In quiet sit, every morning, for at least 10 to 15 minutes. No phone. No TV. Just you and quiet. Try to avoid the mental to-do list. Just sit and listen and be.

    5. Play with people who are fun and have fun with your kids. They aren’t always going to want you around, so if you have a craving to play, now’s the time. Picnics, nature walks, banging on pots and pans. Embrace this chance to do what other adults don’t always take the time to do – play and have fun. I used to tell myself having kids felt was like I was on vacation. And we had a lot of fun for sure.

    6. Enjoy inputs that uplift – music, books, TV, movies. Uplifting generates good thoughts which drive positive emotions and actions. This is why the Hallmark Channel is so popular.

    When we show up for ourselves and be the best we can be, we’re easier to be around. We don’t mind solitude, and we don’t look for people and activities outside of us to make us feel better. And, if you do feel lonely, and if you feel darkness overcomes you more often than not, please reach out to someone. You’re not alone.


    Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

    Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

    Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

    Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

    I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

    Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

    Checklist
    An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

    Cookbook Writing Workbook

    What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

    10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

  • Anthony Bourdain

    It comes as no surprise  – the death of Anthony Bourdain has touched so many. Bourdain’s post-chef career as a food writer, author, and travel show host was launched by his writing, Don’t Eat Before Reading This, published in The New Yorker in April 1999.

    Shortly after this no-name chef told his story about what happens behind closed doors in restaurants, he was offered a contract for his first book Kitchen Confidential. The rest, as they say, was history.

    What captivated me was his willingness to go where most wouldn’t dare. His honest, descriptive, and shocking appraisals of life in a restaurant kitchen weren’t liked by all, but, by and large, his I-don’t-give-a-flying-you-know-what attitude and the sheer act of being himself created fans who loved and admired him for writing like he talked and being who he was.

    Bourdain, interviewed on the occasion of his 60th birthday for First We Feast quipped, “I joke about not giving a f*** being a very good business model for me,” he said, “but it’s true. The absolute certainty that nobody was going to buy or read or care about Kitchen Confidential was what allowed me to write it. I didn’t have to think about what people expected. I didn’t care. And as a result, I was able to write this book quickly and without tormenting myself. And that seemed to work out and I learned from that experience and I tried very hard. Whether I’m meeting with a group of television executives or telling a story, I don’t think about ‘the fans’; I don’t think about what audiences expect, and I’m not afraid of what will they think of me, or what if they don’t like it and I’m not on television anymore.” And then the kicker, the thing that got the audience pumping, “You know, I’ll go back to brunch….. I don’t care.”

    Here’s what I think is the saddest part of the whole turn of events this past week with Bourdain, and even in the same light, Kate Spade.  His fan’s love and admiration for him, and his bad-boy ways, wasn’t enough to overcome the darkness and despair, and maintain the energy required to continue to live life as he knew it.  So, he made the decision to leave it all, including a sweet 11-year old daughter.

    My hope and belief is that he is now at peace connected to Love in a way that none of us have ever experienced. I for one would love to know what he really thinks about this “place”. For if there’s one mortal person I know I could count on for the full report it’s Anthony Bourdain.


    Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

    Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

    Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

    Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

    I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

    Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

    Checklist
    An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

    Cookbook Writing Workbook

    What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

    10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

  • Going LIVE!

    If there is one change I made to my business (and personal life) during the past year that made a huge difference for me and my clients (and family) it would be “going live”.

    When you’re LIVE people can see you on camera. There is more connection, engagement, communication.

    So, in the past 12 months, I’ve had

    • LIVE Mastermind Groups
    • LIVE 1:1 Coaching Calls
    • LIVE WeChat calls with my son in Austria
    • LIVE group video calls with my siblings
    • LIVE Cookbook Writing Q & A calls for members of my email list

    LIVE is risky. Not only can people hear us, but they can see us. We put ourselves and our faces out there.

    LIVE is so good. Plus it’s fun and connects me with clients and family like never before.

    As a result of LIVE broadcasts, masterminds, and coaching I tripled my coaching and mastermind client load over the past 12 months.

    And, LIVE gets easier and easier the more I do.

    Next, I plan to offer LIVE webinars, Q & A Calls, and Facebook or YouTube LIVE to promote my work to a larger audience.

    How much LIVE work are you doing in your business?

    If you said not much, I challenge you to take the time to LIVE.


    Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

    Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

    Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

    Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

    I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

    Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

    Checklist
    An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

    Cookbook Writing Workbook

    What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

    10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

  • A New Way to Set Goals

    This morning I’m in New York City. I plan to visit Kitchen Arts and Letters bookstore (actually cookbook and food book store!) and visit the 911 Memorial. This afternoon I’ll head over to Book Expo America and tomorrow I sign galley copies of my two new cookbooks.

    Set Goals From Abundance

    I’m sure you have all set goals.

    One way I learned to set goals was to write goals that were SMART – specific, measurable, actionable, realistic, and time-sensitive.

    This method of goal setting focuses on lack. I’m here. My goal is there. We are separated until I reach my goal. For me this may lead to striving and putting my goal on a pedestal. That creates distance from the goal and it seems out of reach at least to me.

    My business coach taught me to write goals in a new way.

    Write them as if you already have them.

    And, here’s the key – mix in goals you already have achieved.

    For example:

    I want a happy, loving marriage. I have a happy, loving marriage.
    I want three healthy children. I have three healthy children.
    I want to be a homeowner. I have a lovely, cozy home.
    I want to save money for retirement. I have saved money for retirement.
    I want clients I adore and that I can serve. I have clients I adore and that I can serve.
    I want a healthy relationship with my mother and mother-in-law. I have a healthy relationship with my mother and mother-in-law.
    I want to be an involved part of a large, extended family that I have fun with. I am an involved part of a large, extended family that I have fun with.
    I want friends I love to spend time with. I have friends I love to spend time with.
    I want to have freedom of time and good health. I have freedom of time and good health.
    I want to write cookbooks. I have written four cookbooks.
    I want to be a member of Les Dames Escoffier. I have an invitation to Les Dames!
    I want a positive attitude based on my deliberate thoughts. I have a positive attitude based on my deliberate thoughts.
    I want a business built around cookbooks. I have a business built around cookbooks.
    I want to create value and a variety of offerings for my clients. I create value and offer services to my clients in a variety of ways.
    I want to create a cookbook writers mastermind group. I have a cookbook writers mastermind group.
    I want to have high-end private coaching clients. I have high-end coaching clients.
    I want to leverage my expertise with book-writing software. I leverage my expertise with book-writing software.
    I want the freedom to travel with my family. I have the freedom to travel with my family.
    I want to believe that I can do anything if I show up to offer value and serve. I believe that I can do anything if I show up to offer value and serve.
    I want to believe that everything is easy. I have the belief that everything is easy.
    I want to leverage competition so we work collaboratively. I work collaboratively with the competition.
    I want to host a podcast. I host a podcast.
    I want to eat and drink in a way that gives me energy, good health, and good sleep. I eat and drink in a way that gives me energy, good health, and good sleep.

    The fun part is that your brain doesn’t know what’s real and what’s not. It believes what you tell it! And, when I read a list like this I feel abundance because much of what’s on the list I already have.

    It’s time to write our goals as if they are already done. What’s on your list?


    Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

    Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

    Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

    Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

    I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

    Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

    Checklist
    An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

    Cookbook Writing Workbook

    What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

    10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

  • 5 Tips for Energy Management

    The older I get the more I realize how important my energy level is.

    I’m not talking about 5-Hour Energy drinks or extreme coffee consumption, I’m talking about natural feel-good energy.

    Because when I have energy, I’m more positive, appreciative, and focused. A better version of me. My business benefits. My family benefits. My clients benefit. And most importantly, when I feel good I offer value all around.

    Here are a few of my “secrets”  to energy management:

    1. Adequate sleep. With teens out driving around, I set a curfew for them, and adjust my sleep. No excuses or stories. This was key even when they were little and waking me up at night.

    2. Intentional hydration with water

    3. Limited sugar, white flour, alcohol, and caffeine. (And Peeps, chocolate bunnies, and Opera Cream eggs.🐣)

    4. Lot’s of fresh veggies, whole-grains, and high-quality protein from fish, legumes, lean beef, chicken, and tofu.

    5. Some sort of body movement every day: walk the dog, head to the gym, take the steps, dance in the kitchen (the kids love this), vacuum the house.

    Some think this doesn’t sound like “fun”. But I’ll tell you what’s fun.

    Feeling energetic and patient.

    Feeling physically good in my body – no aches or pains.

    Having the energy to wake up earlier than the rest of the house to think and focus.

    Getting in the zone while my kids are in school and then focus on the family after 3:00 pm.

    That’s my prescription for energy.

    And here’s the best part – it works for kids too! And you should see what happens then.


    Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

    Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

    Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

    Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

    I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

    Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

    Checklist
    An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

    Cookbook Writing Workbook

    What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

    10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

  • How To Write A Cookbook Revisited

    If you have been following me here on this blog for any time, you may know I can pretty easily rattle off the action steps to write a cookbook.

     

     

    • Identify your goals for publication
    • Define your cookbook concept
    • Evaluate routes to publication
    • Build your author platform
    • Check you commitment
    • Study your competition
    • Write a cookbook proposal
    • Shop for an agent or editor
    • Sign a contract OR
    • Decide to self-publish
    • Write your cookbook manuscript
    • Publish your book
    • Market your new book
    • If you want to read all about this action on my blog, click here.

    Sounds simple right.

    Actually, it is pretty cut and dry.

    It’s easy to talk about action. Just do this. Then do that. Follow the steps. Write and publish your cookbook.

    Then our brains seize up. Our brain wants to protect us and it sees change as scary.

    We feel:

    • Scared of putting ourselves “out there. People won’t like me or my ideas.
    • Uncomfortable when we sit down to work. I don’t like putting my ideas on paper.
    • Uncertain of our ability. I’ve never done this before.
    • Overwhelmed. I have so much to do.
    • Confused. What concept should I write about? I have so many ideas.
    • Self-doubt. I’m not a “real” writer am I?.

    Here’s the best news I have for you today: You can’t write a cookbook from there with a brain trying to control the show. If you feel this way, follow my Revised Steps To Write A Cookbook.

    Step 1:
    Expect to feel scared, uncomfortable, and uncertain.

    Yes, you heard me right: expect these negative emotions.

    Be aware then when they show up, you have a choice to either curl up in a ball and hit the snooze button, or to get up, get out, and take action on your dreams. These negative emotions I like to call “dream currency” emotions. They are the price we pay to grow and evolve into the person we want to be. Writing a book is new and evolves us as people. We grow into our work as writers and authors action by action.

    Every time (and I mean every time) I start a new project my brain does this. It tells me that what I have in mind isn’t a good idea.

    The secret is not to let your brain win. Don’t let fear, discomfort, or uncertainty stand between you and what you want to do. Instead, say to your brain, “I’m on to you and you’re not getting in the way of my dreams. Let’s get to work.” Then, as if by magic, the fear, discomfort, and lack of confidence start to lessen just a bit as we take action. We make progress. Then, the negative emotions lessen more and our brains quiet down. The best thing is that we know that we have our own back. We show up for ourselves no matter how scared, uncomfortable, or how uncertain we feel. That’s huge.

    Step 2:
    Stop thinking (and talking) about the overwhelm, confusion, or doubt. 

    Trust me here. Dwelling on these negative emotions is indulgent. These are self-created dream killers.

    Any new project can feel this way. There is a lot to do. But, when we think about (and talk about to anyone who will listen) how confused, overwhelmed, and unsure we are, our brain looks for evidence to prove this is true. Suddenly, everywhere we see reasons that we’re in fact overwhelmed, confused, or need to doubt ourselves. Then, life starts to get in the way. We don’t take action. Our projects stall. Our books don’t get written. Our dreams die.

    The secret here is to not think or talk about the indulgent dream excuses. Instead, direct your brain. Think and talk about something else. Go have some fun and get your mind off of these dream excuses. Plan deliberate results-oriented action. Choose deliberate thoughts to think and practice:  

    • I can do this, in fact, it’s already done.
    • I have the time and ability to finish my project.
    • I am learning how to do this.
    • It is fun to learn how to do this.
    • Nothing is stopping me from going after this goal
    • I plan to show up for myself and work on my project.
    • What I have to offer is needed and wanted in the world.
    • It is my responsibility and honor to help others and offer value through my work.
    • I will get there. I am on my way.

    Expecting fear, discomfort, and uncertainty is smart. Directing our brains with conversation and thoughts that direct our brain to a place that serves us is even smarter.

    Rinse and repeat as needed.

    Step 3:
    Identify your goals for publication, etc. Plan your action. Put results-oriented tasks on your calendar. And, if you need help, don’t miss this series of blog posts where I outline the action steps. Worksheets included!


    Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

    Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

    Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

    Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

    I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

    Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

    Checklist
    An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

    Cookbook Writing Workbook

    What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

    10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

  • Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 14

    FAMILY COOKBOOKS
    When you embark on a family cookbook, a traditional publisher isn’t your goal. You most likely want to either self-publish a cookbook or you may turn to cookbook and recipe software online. Here’s a review of The Best Cookbook and Recipe Software of 2018.

    COOKBOOK WRITING
    Many of my cookbook-writing clients ask about the difference between their cookbook introduction and their cookbook concept overview in their cookbook proposal. While they are very similar, the biggest difference is the audience:

    Cookbook Introduction audience is the reader. You sell them what the book is about, who you are, and make them buy your book!

    Cookbook Concept Overview audience is the agent or editor. You sell them on representing you and publishing your idea.

    Here are a few articles on Cookbook Introductions:
    Cookbook Introductions: How to Write One and Why You Should Read Them

    How to Write a Cookbook Introduction

    Here is advice on how to write a cookbook proposal that attracts agents and publishers.

    MY ADVICE ABOUT CONTENT IS CONSISTENCY
    As a writer and business owner, I talk a lot about creating content as a cornerstone of a successful business.

    Content is about offering your audience value and helping them. Give them something they like – a tip, recipe, mindset shift.

    Now, here’s the rub: no matter how you deliver this  – via post, podcast, newsletter, print media, YouTube, or other social media platform, the one key to it all is consistency.

    Here are my 5 secrets to create consistent content.

    COOKBOOK NEWS
    Ina Garten’s 11th cookbook is coming out in October. She feels lucky to be writing cookbooks. She keeps notes on what she wants to cooks. She works with flavors and combinations and cooks what she loves. That sounds like a recipe for success to me.

    Have you heard about ckbk an online site to search, save, and share from an online database of cookbooks launching in Spring 2018? I have heard it called the Spotify for recipes. Visit ckbk.com to learn more.

    And, finally, as if we need to buy more cookbooks, here is a list of 10 Books About Food To Add To Your Home Library, presented by eater.com.


    Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

    Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

    Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

    Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

    I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

    Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

    Checklist
    An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

    Cookbook Writing Workbook

    What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

    10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

  • How To Love Your Brain

    I don’t know about you, but my brain tends to stay on all the time.

    It controls what I do and much to my amusement, it tries to control other people! That’s so funny because I don’t always do what my brain wants me to do, yet I spend time actually thinking about what everyone else “should” be doing.

    The reality is: Our brains keep our legs moving, hearts beating, and fingers typing.

    It secretes hormones, gives off nerve impulses and helps me remember my name, where I live, and what I am going to cook for dinner tonight.

    In addition, my brain generates over 60,000 thoughts a day. Maybe you can relate? Thoughts about about injuries while my son plays sports, my kids grades, my son in Austria, shifts in my business, dirt on the kitchen floor, how my dog snores, cookbook sales, weeds in our yard no one was addressing, hair on the bathroom floor, errands I need to run, what someone said to me in that text message, what I thought that text  message meant, and how I need to generate a topic for my next newsletter.

    My brain’s higher function can plan parties, make decisions for my business and believe it or not, even talks me out of my dream goals by telling me to stay safe, eat M&M’s, and watch Netflix. (In other words, be comfortable, Maggie. You’ve done enough.)

    I really started thinking about this and came to the conclusion that we never really learn how to take care of our brains. We read a lot about how to care for our heart, skin, and lungs. Our legs, abs, and hair.When we do read about our brains, the focus is on staying sharp, preventing aging, and Alzheimer’s disease.

    But what about all the other stuff our brain does for us as the amazing living, breathing, thinking machines that we humans are?

    Then, I asked my brain this question,”What have I done for you lately?”

    Here’s what my brain said: “you sometimes feed me crappy foods, you often think crappy thoughts, we hydrate with crappy drinks, you short-cut sleep, and we start our my day at 90 MPH, as soon as your feet hit the floor.” Wow. Nothing like a bit of brain honesty.

    As a result of this conversation with my brain, I decided to experiment with brain love and care. My goal was to see how my brain responded to special loving treatment.  Here’s how the experiment went.

    I decided to feed my brain better. This is naturally where dietitians start  – with nourishing food. So, to honor my brain, I fed it less peanut M&M’s and ice cream. (Two of my favorite sweets.) I served it less beer and wine.  (And I love red wine and a good stout beer.) I cooked it more organic vegetables, whole grains, plant-based entrees, and fish. I snacked on tasty nuts (and not Kettle chips), and blended morning smoothies with dark berries and green vegetables. We drank a lot of fresh water.
    *My brain responded with joy. I experienced fewer brain aches and less brain fog. I’m not even kidding. My brain has never felt so good physically.

    I decided to let my brain get some rest while I sleep at night. I no longer see not sleeping as a badge of honor. Gone were the discussions about how late I stayed up to watch an NBA game, or Jimmy Fallon. (I love Jimmy Fallon too.) At a reasonable time, I washed my face, brushed my teeth, fixed a cup of mint tea, and went to bed. If I wasn’t immediately sleepy, I’d listen to a nice podcast or read a boring, but soothing, book. I also made a decision to cut back on what I suspect interrupted my sleep: reading from iPad and iPhone screens, caffeine, alcohol (there’s that red wine again), and after dinner dessert or snacks.
    *My brain is happy to report that Maggie sleeps at least 6 hours straight almost every night, while it’s having a subconscious party and some really good dreams.

    I decided to wake my brain up gently and monitor inputs. I experimented with stopping morning inputs: not checking email, Twitter, Upwork messages, my calendar, group chats, or Instagram in the morning. (Some of these I hardly have the desire to check at all anymore!) I wake up when the other humans in the house (and their brains) are still asleep. My brain and I pour a cup of coffee and we sit together in a cozy chair with my favorite blanket. We don’t jump into a litany of what we need to do. Most of the time we don’t think about anything, plan anything or read anything.
    *My brain is happy to report that it loves this kinder, gentler morning and the lack of inputs. And here’s the funny part: my brain stays calm and quiet the rest of the day too. Isn’t that interesting?

    I decided to ask my brain some questions. After this period of quiet time, and instead of telling my brain what we were going to do that day, I asked it questions. My brain likes to have something to do, something to figure out.  

    • Who do we want to be today?
    • How do we want to show up for our kids, husband, family, clients, and tasks?
    • What can we think today that we’ll feel so proud of when we go to bed?
    • How can we have more fun today?
    • What’s our good news for today?
    • What can we do today to have fun and make each other laugh and feel good?
    • What can we do to offer value to the world?

    *My brain responded with amazing answers. I feel more loving, connected, and caring to myself and those around me.

    The upshot of this story is that my experiment is over, and I felt so good, I implemented my brain food, rest, awakening, and questions into my daily routine. Physically I feel less brain fog and brain aches. It’s so much easier to operate from a place of physically feeling good. Emotionally I have less negative thoughts, fewer inputs and ideas that are negative, less negative emotions (because I have less negative thoughts), and less of a need for any circumstances or person to change so that I can feel better. If you try to brain love experiment, please keep in touch. I’d love to hear about your results.


    Culinary Dietitian, Cookbook Author, and Cookbook Author Maggie Green, RDN, LD, owns The Green Apron Company. The Green Apron specializes in recipe and cookbook development and offers private and group cookbook coaching programs for aspiring cookbook authors.

    Checklist
    An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

    Cookbook Writing Workbook

    What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

    10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

  • How To Trust Yourself

    My daughter moved home from college over the weekend. She lived in her freshman dorm for eight months and had a great first year. I feel excited about our summer together and it’s good to have her home.

    Today I’ve been thinking a lot about trust. Maybe as a first-time writer, parent, or business owner, you can relate to this.

    Several years ago I really wanted to write a cookbook. I would schedule time on my calendar to write the table of contents for a book proposal,  record a recipe, or even test a recipe. These “scheduled times”  show up on my calendar and my brain would say, “Don’t worry about doing this. It won’t matter anyway. Plus it’s a lot of work, and it’s not going to make any difference if you do it just this once. No one will ever know.”

    The sad thing is I listened to my brain.

    I didn’t create.

    I didn’t write.

    I did this over and over. There was a time when the work I needed to do for my first cookbook wouldn’t get done, again.

    I felt sluggish. I indulged in self-loathing. I didn’t do what I said I was going to do.

    Instead of owning up to the truth of what was going on, I excused myself from myself with you’re really busy, feeling tired, or are confused about what to do.

    And the more I told myself that I was busy, tired, or confused, the more my world showed me evidence that I was tired, busy, or confused. They cycle continued. I less I showed up for myself, and the less I showed up the fewer tasks related to dreams were accomplished.

    Maybe this sounds familiar?

    I’d do anything for my kids, and for my clients. I show up for them, on time. I buy them healthy food, cook for them, feed them. I deliver projects to my clients on time, and when I drove my kids around, I delivered them to their activities on time. I don’t expect my kids or clients to be perfect. I help them with kindness and compassion. I commit to them, and for sure I do what I say I’m going to do. A natural result of this is that my kids and my clients trust me.

    How come I couldn’t trust me? Why when I scheduled time for myself, I didn’t show up?

    After some introspection, I was onto myself.

    I could see the gap between where I was and where I wanted to be.

    I was in reality over here: making plans to write and create content, but instead, my brain was over there: telling me to do everything for everyone, and telling me I was too tired, confused, or busy for myself.

    In order to make permanent changes, the first thing I had to do was decide to become a person who could trust myself. I knew I had it in me, and my decision to grow started everything.

    With a shift in my thinking from “it won’t matter if I skip this task” to, “it does matter, let’s spend an hour and get this done” my feelings started to change.

    First, I observed my feelings of busy, confused, and tired with some kindness and compassion. I soon understood why I wasn’t showing up for myself. My brain was showing me examples of busyness, confusion, and tiredness. That’s what I thought about, so it provided me with evidence that this was true.

    Next, as a result of my observations, I committed to completing all takes I put on my calendar.  I changed my self-talk. I told myself I had plenty of time, just like everyone else who is writing books does.

    When I put a task on my calendar, started to show up for my appointments with me. I spent less time thinking about the things I couldn’t do and focused on what I could do. I realized I wasn’t too busy or tired or confused to take the next steps to achieve my dreams; I was stalling and making excuses.

    As a result of my decision, a shift in thinking, self-observation of feelings, and my commitment to myself, things started to happen. I found a publisher who wanted to read my proposal. I wrote the proposal. I signed a contract. I was on my way to writing the manuscript for my first cookbook. I’ve come a long way since then. Consistent content creation is one of my strong suits, as is writing cookbooks.

    Here’s the irony: This decision, and the shift in my thoughts, actually created time and energy. Instead of sitting around, indulging in “why can’t I get anything done?” or “I don’t feel like doing this”, I produced most results in half the time. I felt more energetic and excited to take time for my tasks. I began to trust myself.

    “You can’t teach anyone anything. You can only help them discover it within themselves.” ~Galileo

    The process of revealing myself to myself, as well as the development of a relationship with myself, is the foundation of everything I have created ever since. And it all started when I learned to trust me.

    When you take time to discover yourself and trust yourself, the sky’s the limit.

    What’s stopping you? I can’t wait to see what you create.


    Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

    Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

    Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

    Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

    I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

    Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

    Checklist
    An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

    Cookbook Writing Workbook

    What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

    10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

  • Cookbook and Food Writing Links Vol. 13

    BRAIN TRAINING
    When I travel I like to ask my brain how I can offer value in my business for my clients. With the change of scenery it comes up with lots of ideas.

    Have you ever tried to ask your brain a specific question? My business coach taught me to direct my brain. She says an undirected brain is like an unsupervised toddler. It can get into trouble.

    Brains that are unattended like to worry or ruminate on made up stories about what we think others are thinking.

    Direct your brain: How can I best use my time today? What is the one thing I can do to offer more value for my clients? How can I help my audience get results ahead of time? What is a new way to offer information of value to my audience? Try it. Your brain is amazing. Put it to work for you, not against you.

    SPRING 2018 COOKBOOKS
    Spring is one of the prime seasons for publishing cookbooks!

    Here are some links to Spring 2018 Cookbook Reviews:
    Spring 2018 Cookbook Preview: The 37 New Cookbooks to Buy This Spring

    Every Spring 2018 Cookbook That Matters

    The 18 Spring Cookbooks We’re Most Excited About

    17 New Spring Cookbooks We Can’t Wait to Stain

     

    Cookbook author, editor, and Culinary Dietitian Maggie Green, RDN, LD coaches first-time cookbook authors during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook. 

    Would you like to write a cookbook, but feel alone in the pre-publication phase of writing?

    Are you stuck thinking about your cookbook idea or has you project fizzled?

    Do you feel overwhelmed with publishing options and the recipes, photography, and publishing process?

    I’ve been there. I know first-hand that there’s not a lot of support for first-time cookbook authors who don’t have an agent or a publisher yet.  That’s why I started my work as a cookbook writing coach.

    Here are a few resources for you as you venture into the world of cookbook writing: 

    Checklist
    An 11-point checklist that helps you answer the question, “Am I Ready to Write a Cookbook?”

    Cookbook Writing Workbook

    What Is A Cookbook Coach? 

    10 Reasons to Hire A Cookbook Coach

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